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Pair of Stick Insects/Phasmid At a glance, you would think there is only 1 Phasmid in the picture, but it is a pair/couple, mating!<br />
This Stick Insect/Phasmid - Abrosoma gibberum is from the sub-family of Aschiphasmatidae, very small in size.  Females are around 3.5 - 4cm whereas the Males are around 2.5cm in size.  Despite this size, they are still not the smallest Phasmid in the world yet, but probably within top 10 smallest.  This species are quite interesting as when adult, and sometimes at sub-adult, Males are known to &#039;ride&#039; the Female for the rest of his life, unless disturbed.  The Male is very thin/slender and might be missed if you don&#039;t take a closer look.<br />
Like most species under the sub-family of Aschiphasmatinae, they have the capability to spray from glands behind their heads as a defensive mechanism.<br />
In this picture, the Female is also holding and egg while being mated by the Male. Abrosoma gibberum,Cameron Highlands,Geotagged,Malaysia,Phasmid,Stick Insect,Summer,Tanah Rata Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Pair of Stick Insects/Phasmid

At a glance, you would think there is only 1 Phasmid in the picture, but it is a pair/couple, mating!
This Stick Insect/Phasmid - Abrosoma gibberum is from the sub-family of Aschiphasmatidae, very small in size. Females are around 3.5 - 4cm whereas the Males are around 2.5cm in size. Despite this size, they are still not the smallest Phasmid in the world yet, but probably within top 10 smallest. This species are quite interesting as when adult, and sometimes at sub-adult, Males are known to 'ride' the Female for the rest of his life, unless disturbed. The Male is very thin/slender and might be missed if you don't take a closer look.
Like most species under the sub-family of Aschiphasmatinae, they have the capability to spray from glands behind their heads as a defensive mechanism.
In this picture, the Female is also holding and egg while being mated by the Male.

    comments (4)

  1. Riding for life, any reason for that behavior? Posted 2 years ago
    1. Not much are known about them, Ferdy but a bit of observation by the Taxanomist, Dr Francis Seow, who described them only in 1995. His observations and also from what I saw, they are most likely to be found in pairs, with the Male mating the Female (there is a different with a Male 'just riding' the Female and not mating). Most Phasmids mate for short period like minutes and then separated. It seems the Female can 'store' the sperm packet delivered by the Male and use it to fertilise her eggs for the rest of her life. There is a possibility that this species tends to be monogamous(?) or it could be that they are rare to the extent that when a Male found a Female, he hold-on to her for the rest of his life. Posted 2 years ago
      1. Fascinating, strange that they are studied so little. Posted 2 years ago
        1. Probably its not too interesting a subject to scientists or researchers and also there are very few scientists that have specific interests in Phasmids. Posted 2 years ago

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Abrosoma gibberum is a stick insect in the family Aschiphasmatidae.

Similar species: Stick And Leaf Insects
Species identified by Martin Lagerwey
View Albert Kang's profile

By Albert Kang

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 30, 2016. Captured Aug 29, 2016 19:58 in 40, 59, Tanah Rata, 39000 Tanah Rata, Pahang, Malaysia.
  • TG-4
  • f/13.0
  • 1/80s
  • ISO800
  • 13.47mm