JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Common flatwing (Austroargiolestes icteromelas) Mature males are readily identifiable by the thorax (only) being very pruinose. <br />
Mature females can also be quite pruinescent on the thorax. <br />
These are medium-sized damselflies that perch with their wings spread flat (except shortly after emerging). This one is a young female and the pterostigma colour should darken on maturity. Australia,Austroargiolestes calcaris,Austroargiolestes icteromelas,Common flatwing,Damselfly,Geotagged,Odonata,Powdered flatwing,Spring Click/tap to enlarge

Common flatwing (Austroargiolestes icteromelas)

Mature males are readily identifiable by the thorax (only) being very pruinose.
Mature females can also be quite pruinescent on the thorax.
These are medium-sized damselflies that perch with their wings spread flat (except shortly after emerging). This one is a young female and the pterostigma colour should darken on maturity.

    comments (13)

  1. Found this interactive guide for ordonata species in Australia, perhaps it helps?
    http://rnr.id.au/cgi-bin/species/odonata
    Posted 5 years ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy. Reiner Richter is a regular collaborator. I will search for it in an hour or so. Posted 5 years ago
  2. Megapodrianidae, female Austroargiolestes christine? http://www.therebedragonflies.com.au/Images/Megapodagrionidae/MilkyFlatwing/Austroargiolestes%20christine%20MILKY%20FLATWING%206.jpg Posted 5 years ago, modified 5 years ago
    1. Thanks for that. Do you think the pale pterostigma are not a problem? Posted 5 years ago
      1. Yes they are, u-turn ;) Do you agree on Megapodrianidae, Austroargiolestes sp.?
        Looking back again to your photo, it seems an immature, probably pterostigmas will become dark brown.
        There are dozen more Austroargiolestes and really don't know how to distinguish them without a key.
        Posted 5 years ago, modified 5 years ago
        1. Yes genus looks good - I'm going through the known ranges of some other species and trying to find imm. shots - I'll get it eventually. Time is the big issue right now. :) Posted 5 years ago
        2. I'm thinking of Austroargiolestes calcaris which is known in our area and has the pale pterostigma.
          What do you think? Full sunlight shot here http://photos.rnr.id.au/2014/12/12/damselfly_Austroargiolestes_calcaris_f_BawBaw141212-7156.jpg
          Posted 5 years ago
          1. Yes, probably. Yesterday I've seen that image and this one too,
            http://wildiaries.com/system/pictures/0006/7619/damselfly_Austroargiolestes_calcaris_f_Bunyip111221-1857_hero_xl.jpg
            Both seems to check, but some features do not check such as some thorax markings. For example, on both images a black antehumeral line is closed, and yours appear to be open, probably with age and pruinosis will go darker (not confirmed..)
            On Dragonflypix http://www.dragonflypix.com/auskey/species/austroargiolestes_calcaris.html#close there is a series of couplets that seem to show particular markings of A. calcaris, here are some images, also:
            http://www.dragonflypix.com/ausspeciespages/austroargiolestes_calcaris.html
            Please try to confirm it with expert. Although this group as large number of species, some of them seem easy to identify, but they could be tricky because of that. Hope this would help. My best, cheers*
            Posted 5 years ago
            1. Thanks for the inputs.
              After looking through the possibilities I see it's wise to be cautious. I know some are mis-named also. :(
              I'll chat with our museum people.
              Posted 5 years ago
              1. Please, do. After that please reply again in this comment box to tell us what was the final ID. Thank you so much! Cheers* Posted 5 years ago
                1. They were curious about pterostigma colour but the verdict is that it will change by maturity. Therefore most likely is Common flatwing - Austroargiolestes icteromelas (I detected some reservation in the statement the these two are very difficult to distinguish in imm. stages) Posted 5 years ago
                  1. it's good to hear that. Thank you so much for your reply! Have a great day! My best, cheers* Posted 5 years ago
  3. Austroargiolestes calcaris after some discussion with local enthusiasts (and after re-finding my 'The Complete Field Guide To Dragonflies Of Australia')
    Some may look very similar but it turns out that only A.icteromelas is also found in our part of Australia. Young female.
    Posted 5 years ago, modified 5 years ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

The common flatwing is a very common species of damselfly of the subfamily Argiolestinae in the family Megapodagrionidae. It is also as the Australian flatwing.

Similar species: Dragonflies And Damselflies
Species identified by Mark Ridgway
View Mark Ridgway's profile

By Mark Ridgway

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 11, 2016. Captured Oct 1, 2013 15:09 in 24 Forest Oak Dr, Upper Ferntree Gully VIC 3156, Australia.
  • DSC-HX30V
  • f/4.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO100
  • 13.23mm