JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Cicindela hybrida The northern dune tiger beetle. I think this is one of the most beautiful bugs in holland. I can only find them in a very small region near some very old settlements (fort de Roovere) in Bergen op Zoom. The map is pint point accurate so if anyone also whats to photograph them this is where u need to be, and in summer there are a lot of them in that exact region. Cicindela hybrida,Geotagged,Netherlands,Six-spotted tiger beetle,Spring Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Cicindela hybrida

The northern dune tiger beetle. I think this is one of the most beautiful bugs in holland. I can only find them in a very small region near some very old settlements (fort de Roovere) in Bergen op Zoom. The map is pint point accurate so if anyone also whats to photograph them this is where u need to be, and in summer there are a lot of them in that exact region.

    comments (17)

  1. Marvelous macro stack, great choice of focus plane.

    Dave
    Posted 3 years ago
    1. Thanks! But this is not a stack, just F16 used.
      Posted 3 years ago
      1. The depth is amazing, I was convinced it was a stack. By the way, nothing wrong with stacks, I often do freehand stacks of 2 or 3 images.

        My lens quality falls off, the further I move away from f8, so I very rarely move outside the range f5.6 to f11. I would say 95% of my shots are at f8 and I will play with the speed and ISO to get the exposure that I want.

        Dave
        Posted 3 years ago
        1. I also sometimes try to get a stack with 2 or 3 images. But mostly it is on f16 Most of my reversed lenses i use on f16. The lenses are sharper on F8 but with a little sharpening in lightroom it works great! Posted 3 years ago
          1. What software do you use for the stacks?

            Dave
            Posted 3 years ago
            1. Photoshop, I have used Zerene and Helicon before but Photoshop works great for me. Posted 3 years ago
              1. I tried Helicon but was not impressed. CS6 was a huge step forward.

                Dave
                Posted 3 years ago
        2. I had the same thing with Jeroen's images, it blows my mind that most are not stacked. On Facebook I had seen some macro photographers bragging about their 64 image stack, slider gear and specialized software. Yet here is Jeroen, not using any of that, and still getting superior images. Very inspirational. Posted 3 years ago
          1. I totally agree.

            Dave
            Posted 3 years ago
          2. Thanks Ferdy,
            well, if you make a stack with 64 images at the sharpest aperture (F6 or F8) the picture can be much sharper! But now way you can get that sharpness with a living critter. So i like to use F16 and the sharpening tool in lichtroom ;)
            Posted 3 years ago
          3. How about 8000 photos in 1?
            http://microsculpture.net/
            Posted 3 years ago
            1. my god Ani, that is such a cool video! 2-5 weeks of work per photo, but so worth it! Posted 3 years ago
            2. Yea that really is impressive!! Posted 3 years ago
  2. ..knowing the speed of the cicindela ...it s just an awesome shot... Posted 3 years ago
    1. yea they really are fast! But in the really small region i find them there are hundreds, so with a little luck and a lot of time spent one of them stays still. Posted 3 years ago
  3. Great shot, what lens was used for this? Posted 3 years ago
  4. Thanks! I used a reversed 28mm Nikon AI lens for this photo. Posted 3 years ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Cicindela hybrida'', also known as the northern dune tiger beetle, has a wide distribution in the Palaearctic region.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by JHoppenbrouwers
View JHoppenbrouwers's profile

By JHoppenbrouwers

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 22, 2016. Captured May 14, 2015 14:46 in Ligneweg, 4661 Halsteren, Netherlands.
  • NIKON D7100
  • f/1.0
  • 1/160s
  • ISO125