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Amber Mountain Rock Thrush (male), Amber Mountain, Madagascar Amber Mountain as a National Park was a bit of a letdown due to the weird paths, traffic and safety issues as explained here:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/36873/amber_mountain_np_madagascar.html" title="Amber Mountain NP, Madagascar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/36873_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1656547210&Signature=YMWO%2FIfWw3FoZ8e%2FOrEO8yx%2FPNM%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Amber Mountain NP, Madagascar Is this what you would have expected when going to a supposedly jungle-covered mountain? Neither did we. Amber mountain was a disappointment in several ways. As you can see, the path is very wide. It is used by local villagers (they shouldn&#039;t) as well as cars using this path as a shortcut to bring tourists unable or unwilling to walk to the next point in the park. <br />
<br />
The actual forest is on the sides of the trail, as you can see. Yet it is elevated, so it is very hard to properly spot or photograph species. Oh, and 2/3 of the park was closed due to safety issues around the lakes. It has folks looking to rob you, and a killing has been reported as well. In the areas that are open, there are several military checkpoints. <br />
<br />
Not great. Yet with two visits planned in our program we figured to just make the best of it. With a wish-list of species in hand, we went on a &quot;hunt&quot; to find them all, and that way still made things enjoyable. Africa,Amber Mountain,Madagascar,Madagascar North,World" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
That said, we had two days planned in the park, and tried to make the best of it. Day one already rewarded us with some locally endemic chameleon species. On day two, one of our main goals was to see the top bird in the park, the Amber Mountain Rock Thrush. <br />
<br />
Fortunately, it was around the very first corner we did on this hike. We&#039;re thinking it was dumb luck, as we did not see it anymore during the whole two days. And even better, we also saw the female nearby:<br />
<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/37560/amber_mountain_rock_thrush_female_amber_mountain_madagascar.html" title="Amber Mountain Rock Thrush (female), Amber Mountain, Madagascar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/37560_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1656547210&Signature=2FjnGHHZhkG3BmSPqz2WyyR2LgM%3D" width="200" height="166" alt="Amber Mountain Rock Thrush (female), Amber Mountain, Madagascar The male:<br />
http://www.jungledragon.com/image/37559/amber_mountain_rock_thrush_male_amber_mountain_madagascar.html Africa,Amber Mountain,Amber Mountain rock thrush,Geotagged,Madagascar,Madagascar North,Monticola sharpei erythronotus,Spring,World" /></a></figure> Africa,Amber Mountain,Amber Mountain rock thrush,Geotagged,Madagascar,Madagascar North,Monticola sharpei erythronotus,Spring,World Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Amber Mountain Rock Thrush (male), Amber Mountain, Madagascar

Amber Mountain as a National Park was a bit of a letdown due to the weird paths, traffic and safety issues as explained here:

Amber Mountain NP, Madagascar Is this what you would have expected when going to a supposedly jungle-covered mountain? Neither did we. Amber mountain was a disappointment in several ways. As you can see, the path is very wide. It is used by local villagers (they shouldn't) as well as cars using this path as a shortcut to bring tourists unable or unwilling to walk to the next point in the park. <br />
<br />
The actual forest is on the sides of the trail, as you can see. Yet it is elevated, so it is very hard to properly spot or photograph species. Oh, and 2/3 of the park was closed due to safety issues around the lakes. It has folks looking to rob you, and a killing has been reported as well. In the areas that are open, there are several military checkpoints. <br />
<br />
Not great. Yet with two visits planned in our program we figured to just make the best of it. With a wish-list of species in hand, we went on a "hunt" to find them all, and that way still made things enjoyable. Africa,Amber Mountain,Madagascar,Madagascar North,World


That said, we had two days planned in the park, and tried to make the best of it. Day one already rewarded us with some locally endemic chameleon species. On day two, one of our main goals was to see the top bird in the park, the Amber Mountain Rock Thrush.

Fortunately, it was around the very first corner we did on this hike. We're thinking it was dumb luck, as we did not see it anymore during the whole two days. And even better, we also saw the female nearby:


Amber Mountain Rock Thrush (female), Amber Mountain, Madagascar The male:<br />
http://www.jungledragon.com/image/37559/amber_mountain_rock_thrush_male_amber_mountain_madagascar.html Africa,Amber Mountain,Amber Mountain rock thrush,Geotagged,Madagascar,Madagascar North,Monticola sharpei erythronotus,Spring,World

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The Amber Mountain rock thrush is a songbird in the family Muscicapidae, formerly placed in the Turdidae together with the other chats. It is now usually considered a subspecies of the forest rock thrush.

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 6, 2016. Captured Oct 14, 2015 08:17 in Unnamed Road, Madagascar.
  • NIKON D800
  • f/5.6
  • 1/100s
  • ISO1100
  • 400mm