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Moth girl blowing kisses (Pingasa cinerea) Attracted to lights at night at the edge of the local national park. Initially I thought it was two moths mating. The head is near the centre and fore wings to the top. This one is an unusual pale form. Australia,Geotagged,Pingasa cinerea,Spring,geometridae Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Moth girl blowing kisses (Pingasa cinerea)

Attracted to lights at night at the edge of the local national park. Initially I thought it was two moths mating. The head is near the centre and fore wings to the top. This one is an unusual pale form.

    comments (10)

  1. I've never seen a moth holding it's wings this way.
    http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/geom/ciner.html
    Posted 3 years ago, modified 3 years ago
    1. Cute isn't it. Makes my shoulders hurt just looking at it. Posted 3 years ago
    2. Thank you, I couldn't figure it out either. @Mark: fantastic, truly unique and educational! Posted 3 years ago
  2. Wow, just stumbled on this old post - nature just keeps on surprising ... thanks for sharing that one Mark! :o) Posted one year ago
    1. Glad you found her Arp. ;-) Posted one year ago
  3. How curious to hold the forewings in such a position! And a great example of pareidolia, very sweet. Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks for making look up pareidolia Ruth ;) Posted one year ago
      1. Oh! now I see the blowing kisses! I had not noticed earlier! Those little hands in the middle :-D Posted one year ago
        1. 8-D and the little buttons on her dress and the beady little eyes - easy to forget it's a moth. Posted one year ago
          1. True! is more a little doll :-D Posted one year ago

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''Pingasa cinerea'', the tan-spotted grey, is a moth of the family Geometridae. It is found in Australia .

The wingspan is about 30 mm. Adults are grey-brown with a wavy pattern of darker markings. They have a rare resting posture, with the forewings dislocated to point forward.

The larvae are pale brown and covered in spiky warts.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Mark Ridgway
View Mark Ridgway's profile

By Mark Ridgway

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 28, 2016. Captured Dec 15, 2015 00:09 in 161 Belview Terrace, Tremont VIC 3785, Australia.
  • DSC-HX30V
  • f/4.0
  • 1/200s
  • ISO100
  • 9.16mm