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Leaf Insect Phyllium giganteum is a tentative ID based on comment in this link that only one species known in Borneo (although new species are currently being found). See: <br />
<a href="https://books.google.be/books?id=m-CEnf3DabIC&amp;pg=PA58&amp;lpg=PA58&amp;dq=phyllium+and+borneo&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=U6sBrR9nv9&amp;sig=EH29cq0okQ9K2r_jUJhIAPeT2rY&amp;hl=es&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiN5fyZ3YLOAhXrBcAKHcj_B3YQ6AEIQTAJ#v=onepage&amp;q=phyllium" rel="nofollow">https://books.google.be/books?id=m-CEnf3DabIC&amp;pg=PA58&amp;lpg=PA58&amp;dq=phyllium+and+borneo&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=U6sBrR9nv9&amp;sig=EH29cq0okQ9K2r_jUJhIAPeT2rY&amp;hl=es&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiN5fyZ3YLOAhXrBcAKHcj_B3YQ6AEIQTAJ#v=onepage&amp;q=phyllium</a> and borneo&amp;f=false<br />
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It is a most likely yet undefined species of Phyllidae.<br />
Leaf insects (family Phylliidae) display a remarkable form of mimicry, where their wings and legs closely resemble the color and shape of leaves, including vein patterns. Some species also show markings mimicking spots of disease or damage such as holes or bite marks. Leaf insects can even move in a way that mimics a real leaf being blown by the wind, further confusing predators. Leaf insects are found from South Asia through Southeast Asia to Australia. They are related to the stick insects in the family Phasmatidae; both belong to the order Phasmatodea.<br />
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<a href="http://www.britannica.com/animal/leaf-insect" rel="nofollow">http://www.britannica.com/animal/leaf-insect</a><br />
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 Geotagged,Malaysia,Phyllium arthurchungi,Summer,Walking Leaf Insect,leaf insect Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Leaf Insect

Phyllium giganteum is a tentative ID based on comment in this link that only one species known in Borneo (although new species are currently being found). See:
https://books.google.be/books?id=m-CEnf3DabIC&pg=PA58&lpg=PA58&dq=phyllium+and+borneo&source=bl&ots=U6sBrR9nv9&sig=EH29cq0okQ9K2r_jUJhIAPeT2rY&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiN5fyZ3YLOAhXrBcAKHcj_B3YQ6AEIQTAJ#v=onepage&q=phyllium and borneo&f=false


It is a most likely yet undefined species of Phyllidae.
Leaf insects (family Phylliidae) display a remarkable form of mimicry, where their wings and legs closely resemble the color and shape of leaves, including vein patterns. Some species also show markings mimicking spots of disease or damage such as holes or bite marks. Leaf insects can even move in a way that mimics a real leaf being blown by the wind, further confusing predators. Leaf insects are found from South Asia through Southeast Asia to Australia. They are related to the stick insects in the family Phasmatidae; both belong to the order Phasmatodea.

http://www.britannica.com/animal/leaf-insect

    comments (10)

  1. Sorry, a genus is not specific enough for the creation of a species record. Posted 7 years ago
  2. Quite amazing, what an extraordinary creature! Posted 7 years ago
  3. Hi fcrhistant: I was told by people who saw this spotting when I posted in Project Noah that the species may not yet be defined as many of these insects are yet not classified and that it could even be a new species. For that reason it was chosen as Fact of the Day in their web site. Hence, this s why I could not narrow down the ID for this insect at the species level. See: http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/1921246002
    One of the commenters, Albert Kang said to me that he knows a scientist that is currently classifying these animals taxonomically and that his book will come out next year.
    Posted 7 years ago
    1. Sorry for not responding to this 7 month old comment earlier, I had never seen it, somehow it slipped through.

      I see that you managed to find the species, which is fantastic. And what a species it is! Strange that dutch Wikipedia, which is tiny, has an extensive article yet english Wikipedia does not:

      https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllium_giganteum

      To throw in one fun fact regarding this species: in captivity, females will lay eggs that if not fertilized by males, will still hatch, and the result will be all-females. That's crazy, I'm surprised the world hasn't been taken over yet by female leafs.
      Posted 6 years ago
      1. Haha! maybe they are picky on what they eat! :-) Yes, I am surprised that asexual reproduction works well for these animals. One of the reason that sexual reproduction exists is to generate genetic diversity to give the population a chance to adapt to an extreme change in environment. In such circumstances clones may not survive but only sexual offspring with the right genetic variant. In some species it is an alternative but asexual reproduction still works. But I think is an indicator that their environment is not one that cahnges often (as expected for a tropical forest). Now, humans are the triggers of changes in their environment so that may force the species towards sexual reproduction to survive in the long term. (Just some reflections about this :-) Posted 6 years ago, modified 6 years ago
        1. "One of the reason that sexual reproduction exists is to generate genetic diversity to give the population a chance to adapt to an extreme change in environment."

          That's such a fascinating statement. I've never questioned in my life why it exists or why we have genders, I've always taken it as a given. It is so bizarre to think that in specific cases, it's not needed.
          Posted 6 years ago
  4. This is not Phyllium gigganteum.
    I have given you the ID at Project Noah.
    It is a newly described species - Phyllium arthurchungi, featured in the new book, A Taxanomic guide to the Stick Insects of Borneo by Dr Francis Seow Choen.
    Posted 6 years ago
    1. Dear Albert,
      Thanks for your input. I know you told me it was a new species but you had not added the complete new species name in your message back then. Ferdy asked me to try and complete the species IDs for species for which I only had genus name. As I do not have access to this new book I added the other sp name as tentative. I will now change it. Could you please provide me more information to describe the species, as you seem to have access to the book? (BTW, is it the book where your pics are featured? by the way congratulations again :-)
      Posted 6 years ago, modified 6 years ago
  5. Dear Patomarazul, at the time of my first ID suggestion, the species was not officially described yet. I gave another ID suggestion 4 days ago after I got hold of the Book and can verify the full ID. Posted 6 years ago
    1. aaah! that explains it because I was not looking these past days to my PN spottings so I may have missed it. I will check it later. BTW, wonderful that you joined JD. Your spottings will be greatly appreciated here, as well as your expertise! :-) Posted 6 years ago

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Phyllium (Phyllium) arthurchungi is a recently described walking leaf insect in the order Phasmatodea
Phyllium are a textbook example of mimicry in nature and an almost perfect imitation of a leaf.

Similar species: Stick And Leaf Insects
Species identified by Martin Lagerwey
View Patomarazul's profile

By Patomarazul

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Uploaded Nov 28, 2015. Captured Sep 22, 2015 04:58 in Jalan Sepilok, Sepilok, 90000 Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia.
  • SP-100EE
  • f/2.9
  • 10/800s
  • ISO125
  • 4.3mm