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Ostrich - New Legs A flock of young Ostrich visit a watering hole.<br />
<br />
Synchronization in nature is magical, spectacular and magnificent.  These little guys probably hatched about 2 weeks ago.  With the rains expected soon, their survival will depend on it.  Grasshoppers and small insects is their main food.  BUT ... the young Eagles are now also ready to leave the nest ... their main enemy.  <br />
<br />
The mother and father Ostriches (both sexes care for the young and eggs) will protect the young, but because the chicks normally number in the twenties, it is not easy to protect them all.  <br />
<br />
Their number one fear.  <br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/33323/bateleur_eagle_-_new_wings.html" title="Bateleur Eagle - New Wings"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2011/33323_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1564012810&Signature=4D6d2tl7tK%2F12YOgJ0JZx2%2BmSKU%3D" width="200" height="132" alt="Bateleur Eagle - New Wings A young Bateleur Eagle spreads his wings at a watering hole.  <br />
<br />
This young eagle has just recently left his nest, and caring mother.  The mother will still provide food, but less and less each time.  It is time for him to find his own wings.  <br />
<br />
It is now middle Spring in Namibia, with day temperatures soaring into the 40&#039;s degrees Celsius.  With such heat, one can only imagine the reason why this eagle is spreading its wings, is to &quot;burn off&quot; ticks and lice that he might have accumulated in the nest.  All the youngsters do this.  <br />
<br />
This young eagle&#039;s favorite food :<br />
http://www.jungledragon.com/image/33324/ostrich_-_new_legs.html Bateleur,Geotagged,Namibia,Spring,Terathopius ecaudatus,beautiful,chick,color,free,golden,nature,outdoors,power,reflection,strength,water,wild,wildlife,wings" /></a></figure><br />
 Geotagged,Namibia,Ostrich,Spring,Struthio camelus,beautiful,camouflage,chicks,cute,life,nature,spots,vulnerable,water,wild,wildlife,young Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Ostrich - New Legs

A flock of young Ostrich visit a watering hole.

Synchronization in nature is magical, spectacular and magnificent. These little guys probably hatched about 2 weeks ago. With the rains expected soon, their survival will depend on it. Grasshoppers and small insects is their main food. BUT ... the young Eagles are now also ready to leave the nest ... their main enemy.

The mother and father Ostriches (both sexes care for the young and eggs) will protect the young, but because the chicks normally number in the twenties, it is not easy to protect them all.

Their number one fear.

Bateleur Eagle - New Wings A young Bateleur Eagle spreads his wings at a watering hole.  <br />
<br />
This young eagle has just recently left his nest, and caring mother.  The mother will still provide food, but less and less each time.  It is time for him to find his own wings.  <br />
<br />
It is now middle Spring in Namibia, with day temperatures soaring into the 40's degrees Celsius.  With such heat, one can only imagine the reason why this eagle is spreading its wings, is to "burn off" ticks and lice that he might have accumulated in the nest.  All the youngsters do this.  <br />
<br />
This young eagle's favorite food :<br />
http://www.jungledragon.com/image/33324/ostrich_-_new_legs.html Bateleur,Geotagged,Namibia,Spring,Terathopius ecaudatus,beautiful,chick,color,free,golden,nature,outdoors,power,reflection,strength,water,wild,wildlife,wings

    comments (1)

  1. I find them so funny. I saw them for the first time in Tanzania. Before, I had no idea that they really look their miniature versions of their parents, minus the different colors. They do seem very fragile when so young. Posted 3 years ago

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The ostrich or common ostrich is either one or two species of large flightless birds native to Africa, the only living member of the genus ''Struthio'', which is in the ratite family. Some analyses indicate that the Somali ostrich may be better considered a full species separate from the Common Ostrich, but most taxonomists consider it to be a subspecies.

The ostrich shares the order Struthioniformes with the kiwis, emus, rheas and cassowaries. However, phylogenetic studies have shown.. more

Similar species: Ostriches
Species identified by Living Wild
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By Living Wild

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 31, 2015. Captured Oct 15, 2015 16:52 in Unnamed Road, Namibia.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  • f/8.0
  • 1/166s
  • ISO100
  • 289mm