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Need more paper.. Ropalidia Marginata - is an Old World species of Paper Wasp found in Pakistan, Peninsular India, Sri Lanka, South-east Asia, and Australia.<br />
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This species is quite unique because they are an all female workers that protect a Queen, while their male counter-parts only eat and mate when they have to. It is hard to distinguish between a Male and a Female wasp of this species, and usually the females are more in numbers than males. The nests of most true paper wasps are characterized by having open combs with cells for brood rearing, and a &#039;petiole&#039;, or constricted stalk, that anchors the nest. Paper wasps secrete a chemical which repels ants, which they spread around the base of the anchor to prevent the loss of eggs or brood.<br />
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The life of these Wasps is quite interesting to read and understand about. Here&#039;s a link to read more on them: <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ropalidia_marginata" rel="nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ropalidia_marginata</a><br />
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I shot this image at the comfort of my doorstep, as they have built their nest right outside my door, on a wall; at the distance of only two steps. Although things could get nasty if they feel threatened, I have so far taken my chances to get as close as possible to these amazing creatures. I hope they don&#039;t get mad at me getting too close to their faces. It probably is not a great idea to let their colony grow in number, as I&#039;ve read they pack a painful sting when things turn bad. Until I decide how to safely remove their nest, I might as well make some images at my risk. Bangalore,Geotagged,India,Indian wasp,Ropalidia marginata,Wasp,comb,fly,insect,pain,paper wasp,sting,wings Click/tap to enlarge Country intro

Need more paper..

Ropalidia Marginata - is an Old World species of Paper Wasp found in Pakistan, Peninsular India, Sri Lanka, South-east Asia, and Australia.

This species is quite unique because they are an all female workers that protect a Queen, while their male counter-parts only eat and mate when they have to. It is hard to distinguish between a Male and a Female wasp of this species, and usually the females are more in numbers than males. The nests of most true paper wasps are characterized by having open combs with cells for brood rearing, and a 'petiole', or constricted stalk, that anchors the nest. Paper wasps secrete a chemical which repels ants, which they spread around the base of the anchor to prevent the loss of eggs or brood.

The life of these Wasps is quite interesting to read and understand about. Here's a link to read more on them: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ropalidia_marginata

I shot this image at the comfort of my doorstep, as they have built their nest right outside my door, on a wall; at the distance of only two steps. Although things could get nasty if they feel threatened, I have so far taken my chances to get as close as possible to these amazing creatures. I hope they don't get mad at me getting too close to their faces. It probably is not a great idea to let their colony grow in number, as I've read they pack a painful sting when things turn bad. Until I decide how to safely remove their nest, I might as well make some images at my risk.

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Ropalidia marginata is an Old World species of paper wasp found in Pakistan, peninsular India, Sri Lanka, South-east Asia and Australia. It was originally described by Fabricius in 1793 under the name Vespa ferruginea, but that name was preoccupied, so the oldest available name for the species is that given to it later by Lepeletier in 1836. One of its subspecies, R. marginata jucunda from New Guinea and Australia, was described in 1898, and two others, R. marginata rufitarsis from Myanmar and R... more

Species identified by Avinash Krishnamurthy
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By Avinash Krishnamurthy

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Uploaded Sep 10, 2015. Captured Sep 10, 2015 12:14 in 5th Cross Rd, MEI Colony, Phase 3, Peenya, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560058, India.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • 1/160s
  • ISO100
  • 50mm