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Eurasian Wren - mini nemesis Interestingly called &quot;winter king&quot; in dutch, shown here during the summer. It&#039;s a new bird in our garden, we think it is here due to insect life boosted by a new section in our garden that we dedicate to wild growth. I&#039;m calling it a mini nemesis due to it being encouraged by the female blackbird in our garden who makes our cat&#039;s life miserable. <br />
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Just like the blackbird, this Wren got cockier every day. That&#039;s why I could approach it this close. Luckily though, its call is pleasant, and not deafening. Eurasian Wren,Geotagged,Heesch,Netherlands,Summer,Troglodytes troglodytes Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Eurasian Wren - mini nemesis

Interestingly called "winter king" in dutch, shown here during the summer. It's a new bird in our garden, we think it is here due to insect life boosted by a new section in our garden that we dedicate to wild growth. I'm calling it a mini nemesis due to it being encouraged by the female blackbird in our garden who makes our cat's life miserable.

Just like the blackbird, this Wren got cockier every day. That's why I could approach it this close. Luckily though, its call is pleasant, and not deafening.

    comments (6)

  1. well it seems to be a great lens your 400mm :D! Posted 4 years ago
    1. I sure do like the lens, the only complaint is range, in some situations its still not enough :) Posted 4 years ago
  2. Such a lovely little bird and great shot! How wonderful that you are having a piece of 'wild' garden, hopefully you will be attracting many more new wonders. Posted 4 years ago
    1. The part is absolutely tiny, yet has dozens of wild flowers, entire colonies of insects and new birds attracted to it. Seems like you do not need much to start a little eco system. Posted 4 years ago
  3. It looks very glum for a Wren...they are normally so much more perky looking...great pics though!! Is your new lens a prime i presume? Have you tried an extender to give you the extra reach? Btw, i have a new video upload of the slowed down bird call which is of a Wren, i will post it in the video section now! Posted 4 years ago
    1. Yes, it looks a little bit evil and puffy in this shot, here's the same bird in another pose:

      Closeup of Eurasian Wren in our garden Very amusing bird to watch, very active and loud.  Eurasian Wren,Geotagged,Heesch,Netherlands,Summer,Troglodytes troglodytes


      This lens is not new, but it's my main zoom lens, a 80-400mm, so definitely not a prime:
      http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/80-400mm.htm

      That said, it really is of a great quality and very versatile. On our once-a-year travels, it is pretty much the only lens I use, particularly on trips where you cannot walk around (safari). I use this one on my full frame camera. Before, and I still have it, I used a Sigma 150-500mm on a DX body (D7000). Crop factor included, that was 750mm of range compared to the 400mm I have now.

      To compensate, I did buy an extender but returned it because I had major focusing issues and could only get soft photos from it. So for now, 400mm is the range I work with. My current method to get more range is to cheat a little. My camera body has a ridiculous 36MP sensor, which leaves tons of room for cropping. Of course this has limitations and only works when your full size original is very sharp. With pixels this tiny, that's a challenge :)

      I love my D800 though. I wouldn't trade it for anything, except maybe a D810 :)
      Posted 4 years ago, modified 4 years ago

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The Eurasian Wren , is a very small bird, and the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae found in Eurasia. In Anglophone Europe, it is commonly known simply as the Wren. It was once lumped with ''Troglodytes hiemalis'' of eastern North America and ''Troglodytes pacificus'' of western North America as the Winter Wren.

It is also highly polygynous, an unusual mating system for passerines.

It occurs in Europe, a belt of Asia from northern Iran and Afghanistan across to Japan... more

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 25, 2015. Captured Jun 26, 2015 13:55 in Burgemeester van Hulstlaan 39, 5384 LR Heesch, Netherlands.
  • NIKON D800
  • f/5.6
  • 1/250s
  • ISO180
  • 400mm