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Western Red Cedars Western red cedars once covered much of the Pacific Northwest and were an important tree to the indigenous people who often used them for canoes, totem poles, and basic construction. Now, they are a high commodity in modern building, valued for its strain grain wood. <br />
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They can reach heights of over 200 ft (60 meters) and up to 13 ft (4 meters) in trunk diameter. Photographed in western Montana.   Geotagged,Montana,Spring,Thuja plicata,United States,trees Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Western Red Cedars

Western red cedars once covered much of the Pacific Northwest and were an important tree to the indigenous people who often used them for canoes, totem poles, and basic construction. Now, they are a high commodity in modern building, valued for its strain grain wood.

They can reach heights of over 200 ft (60 meters) and up to 13 ft (4 meters) in trunk diameter. Photographed in western Montana.

    comments (1)

  1. And beautiful basketry - PNW natives make absolutely beautiful woven products from cedar bark. Posted 5 years ago

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''Thuja plicata'', commonly called western or Pacific redcedar, giant or western arborvitae, giant cedar, or shinglewood, is a species of ''Thuja'', an evergreen coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae native to western North America. The provincial tree of British Columbia, it has extensive applications for Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest.

Similar species: Pinales
Species identified by travismorhardt
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By travismorhardt

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 2, 2015. Captured Apr 26, 2015 12:19 in Kootenai National Forest, National Forest Development Road 398, Heron, MT 59844, USA.
  • NIKON D3300
  • f/4.5
  • 10/800s
  • ISO400
  • 18mm