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Emerald Ash Borer The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a green beetle native to Asia and Eastern Russia. Outside its native region, the emerald ash borer (also referred to as EAB) is an invasive species and is highly destructive to ash trees in its introduced range. The emerald ash borer was first discovered in America in June 2002 in Michigan. It was accidentally brought to the US in ash wood used in shipping materials. Agrilus planipennis,Emerald ash borer Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a green beetle native to Asia and Eastern Russia. Outside its native region, the emerald ash borer (also referred to as EAB) is an invasive species and is highly destructive to ash trees in its introduced range. The emerald ash borer was first discovered in America in June 2002 in Michigan. It was accidentally brought to the US in ash wood used in shipping materials.

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  1. 50 x:

    Emerald Ash Borer (50x) Abdomen The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a green beetle native to Asia and Eastern Russia. Outside its native region, the emerald ash borer (also referred to as EAB) is an invasive species and is highly destructive to ash trees in its introduced range. The emerald ash borer was first discovered in America in June 2002 in Michigan. It was accidentally brought to the US in ash wood used in shipping materials. Agrilus planipennis,Emerald ash borer
    Posted 4 years ago
  2. From today's Facebook post:
    An ecological catastrophe is spreading across North America. The Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis), or EAB, is an invasive, wood-boring beetle that feeds on and kills ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. This unassuming, pretty beetle has become known as the most destructive invasive forest pest to ever invade North America.

    It was first discovered in Michigan in 2002, and has since spread to at least 35 states in addition to several Canadian territories. Since its discovery, the EAB has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America. For example, scientists estimate that 99% of ash trees in Michigan have died since the beetle's discovery there, which equals about 60 million trees. There are approximately seven billion ash trees in North America, and within the next few decades, it's estimated that the EAB could wipe out most of them.

    There are many species of wood-boring beetles, most of which are harmless, or even beneficial. The EAB is different because it is not a native species. It doesn't have any natural predators and the ash trees have no natural defenses against them. Here's how the damage occurs...Adult beetles lay eggs on ash trees. Larvae hatch out of the eggs and feed on phloem tissue, which is under the tree's bark. As the larvae feed, they create winding trails. These trails coalesce and cut off the tree's ability to transport water and nutrients, which results in death for the tree.

    The disappearance of ash trees across an entire continent has consequences. The trees will no longer be there to fulfill their ecological niche. The massive die-off will create a safety hazard from having snags littering landscapes. It will cause an increase in runoff and erosion. Pesticides will be applied in larger quantities in an attempt to control the beetles. Plus, there will be a huge cost just to cut down and dispose of the dead trees.

    Global warming enables the EAB to colonize new areas, where even an especially cold winter will not be enough to stop their spread. Events like polar vortexes may kill many beetles, but it will not kill them all. In fact, extreme, cold weather events may actually help create "super beetles" that will be less vulnerable to cold weather in the future. The solutions to the EAB invasion are not simple and will not come cheaply. This beetle has surely become a serious menace. As the insect’s range continues to spread, despite efforts to combat it, we must seriously start to wonder if we will have to kiss our beloved ash trees goodbye. {Spotted in the USA by JungleDragon user, Mark R. Smith} #JungleDragon
    Posted 3 months ago
    1. This beetle was discovered about 30 miles north of where I live back in 2017. There are a lot of black ash in my township with some almost 200 years old. It will be a tragedy and an ecological disaster when they go. Posted 3 months ago
      1. Wow! I hope some of them will survive. I have never seen an EAB, but I have seen their tunnels on dead trees,and this winter, I've noticed tons of flecking on ash trees. Such an awful sight. Posted 3 months ago
        1. So far so good right here but it is a matter of time. Posted 3 months ago
          1. Sadly very true. Posted 3 months ago

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The emerald ash borer, ''Agrilus planipennis'', is a green beetle native to Asia.

In North America the borer is an invasive species, highly destructive to ash trees in its introduced range. The potential damage of this insect rivals that of Chestnut blight and Dutch Elm Disease. Since its accidental introduction into the United States and Canada in the 1990s, and its subsequent detection in 2002, it has spread to and adjacent parts of Canada. It has killed at least 50 to 100 million ash.. more

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Mark R Smith
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By Mark R Smith

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Uploaded Apr 22, 2015.