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Bee-eater - Timing is everything A Green Bee-eater swoops down for a drink of water.<br />
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I will be the first to admit that this is hardly a good photograph, but my intend is otherwise.  Here one can see the agility of this bird.  Flying at rather high speeds, it will dip down with its beak open scooping up water, while in flight.  This has a lot of hazards as the speed of motion and the drastic weight increase (open beak, scooping up water) will alter the bird&#039;s energy and momentum.  Where is Albert Einstein when you need him ?  He would explain it better.  An idiot&#039;s perspective is this :  Drive at full speed down the highway, then pull the handbrake and see what happens.  In order to survive and succeed in such sudden change of direction and drag, there needs to be extreme flexibility involved.  And all in all, this photograph is there to try and demonstrate this (with tail feathers fanned out to reduce speed and direct motion).     Geotagged,Green bee-eater,Merops orientalis,Namibia,Summer,agile,avian,beautiful,bird,fantastic,green,icon,impress,motion,nature,plumage,speed,splendor,water,wonder Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Bee-eater - Timing is everything

A Green Bee-eater swoops down for a drink of water.

I will be the first to admit that this is hardly a good photograph, but my intend is otherwise. Here one can see the agility of this bird. Flying at rather high speeds, it will dip down with its beak open scooping up water, while in flight. This has a lot of hazards as the speed of motion and the drastic weight increase (open beak, scooping up water) will alter the bird's energy and momentum. Where is Albert Einstein when you need him ? He would explain it better. An idiot's perspective is this : Drive at full speed down the highway, then pull the handbrake and see what happens. In order to survive and succeed in such sudden change of direction and drag, there needs to be extreme flexibility involved. And all in all, this photograph is there to try and demonstrate this (with tail feathers fanned out to reduce speed and direct motion).

    comments (4)

  1. I love it, I find it incredible enough that you managed to focus and capture it, giving the breakneck speeds these birds have. Posted 6 years ago
    1. Thanks a lot Ferdy, for your ever inspiring words that keep one motivated. Appreciated indeed. Posted 6 years ago
  2. I disagree. I think this is a great capture. Preparedness and opportunity meet and make a great shot. I notice that Namibia has an amazing array of wildlife! I must visit. Posted 6 years ago, modified 6 years ago
    1. Thom, your words are like music to my ears ... thank you very much for a generous comment. Yes, over 16 % of Namibia is protected in Government owned National Parks. Then add an extra 28 % protected via Conservancies and private Game Reserves. In a country where over 44 % of the total land mass falls under wildlife protection, you are pretty sure to find some great wildlife spots. Do come visit. Thanks again for your kind words. Posted 6 years ago

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The green bee-eater is a near passerine bird in the bee-eater family. It is resident but prone to seasonal movements and is found widely distributed across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and the Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, western Arabia and Asia through India to Vietnam. They are mainly insect eaters and they are found in grassland, thin scrub and forest often quite far from water.

Species identified by Living Wild
View Living Wild's profile

By Living Wild

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 18, 2015. Captured Mar 8, 2013 17:33 in D2874, Namibia.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  • f/7.1
  • 1/512s
  • ISO200
  • 200mm