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Mound Ant Colony A colony of mound ants always seem to be busy, but they never seem to be doing anything. They build large mounds, sometimes a meter high, and cover it in plant material. From a distance the mound looks just like that, a mound. But upon approaching one, it begins to move as thousands of ants crawl all over it. Crawling in north Idaho. Formica obscuripes,Geotagged,Idaho,Spring,United States,ants,insects Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Mound Ant Colony

A colony of mound ants always seem to be busy, but they never seem to be doing anything. They build large mounds, sometimes a meter high, and cover it in plant material. From a distance the mound looks just like that, a mound. But upon approaching one, it begins to move as thousands of ants crawl all over it. Crawling in north Idaho.

    comments (6)

  1. great real life macro... tough to get! Kudos! :) Posted 4 years ago
    1. Thanks John! I love being able to get macro shots like this, I just don't get to very often because I don't have the right gear for it... Posted 4 years ago
  2. I love ants!! they are up there with jumping spiders for me :) Great shot! Posted 4 years ago
    1. If you like ants, you may like this golden-backed one:

      Closeup of a Golden-backed ant (red head morph), Sri Lanka This ant has two interesting ends: a golden back after which it is named, and a red head, which is not typical for the species, rather it is a morph.  Asia,Camponotus sericeus,Golden backed ant,Macro,Sri Lanka,Wasgamuwa


      Not meaning to hijack your photo, Travis, it's great :)
      Posted 4 years ago
      1. No worries, Ferdy! Posted 4 years ago
    2. Thanks! :) Posted 4 years ago

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''Formica obscuripes'' is a species of ant in the family Formicidae. It is native to North America. It produces large mounds covered by small pieces of plant material. The number of adult workers per colony may be as high as 40,000. ''F. obscuripes'' feeds upon a number of insect species, consumes nectar from homopterous insects they tend, and occasionally eats plant tissue. In the Blue Mountains of Oregon, ''F. obscuripes'' has demonstrated the capacity for polydomy. A supercolony in a four-hectare.. more

Species identified by travismorhardt
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By travismorhardt

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 13, 2015. Captured Mar 22, 2015 16:08 in West Side Road, Bonners Ferry, ID 83805, USA.
  • NIKON D3300
  • f/5.6
  • 10/2000s
  • ISO400
  • 300mm