JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Impala run - Focused on Freedom A pair of Common Impala ewes run across an open field, as seen in the wilds of Namibia, southwestern Africa. <br />
<br />
Besides the obvious motion and blur within this photograph, I like this shot because of the companionship that this species exerts.  The herd will remain together in a close family unit.  Rams are dominant and &quot;outside&quot; rams will compete with the herd ram for dominance and mating rights.  The females will remain together always.  Even if they give birth to a lamb ewe, that baby will remain with the herd also.   Similar to how Elephants form their families.  <br />
<br />
Scent glands are located under the eye (in the case of rams) and at the back of the heel.  In this photograph you can clearly see that gland on this closest ewe.  That black patch above her hoof (guess you can describe it as above her heel) holds the scent gland.  As she walks through the bush, that gland leaves traces of scent for rams and the rest of her herd to pick up.  A truly magnificent adaptation that the majority of antelope species holds.  <br />
<br />
Dominant rams will mark their territory by rubbing their faces on branches and bush within their area (the scent gland under the eye holds the chemicals that sends a message to one and all other Impalas).  Common Impala,Fall,Geotagged,Impala,Namibia,action,antelope,beautiful,blur,ewe,fantastic,grass,green,inspire,magnificent,majestic,mammal,motion,nature,orange Click/tap to enlarge

Impala run - Focused on Freedom

A pair of Common Impala ewes run across an open field, as seen in the wilds of Namibia, southwestern Africa.

Besides the obvious motion and blur within this photograph, I like this shot because of the companionship that this species exerts. The herd will remain together in a close family unit. Rams are dominant and "outside" rams will compete with the herd ram for dominance and mating rights. The females will remain together always. Even if they give birth to a lamb ewe, that baby will remain with the herd also. Similar to how Elephants form their families.

Scent glands are located under the eye (in the case of rams) and at the back of the heel. In this photograph you can clearly see that gland on this closest ewe. That black patch above her hoof (guess you can describe it as above her heel) holds the scent gland. As she walks through the bush, that gland leaves traces of scent for rams and the rest of her herd to pick up. A truly magnificent adaptation that the majority of antelope species holds.

Dominant rams will mark their territory by rubbing their faces on branches and bush within their area (the scent gland under the eye holds the chemicals that sends a message to one and all other Impalas).

    comments (2)

  1. I never saw that gland or knew about it, whilst I've seen quite some Impalas. Thanks for sharing your expertise! Posted 4 years ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy for commenting. You are welcome. Guess right now I am busy concentrating (subconsciously) on the scents of animals. Thanks for clearing that up for me. Posted 4 years ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

The impala is a medium-sized African antelope. It is the type species of the genus ''Aepyceros'' and belongs to the family Bovidae. It was first described by German zoologist Martin Hinrich Carl Lichtenstein in 1812. Two subspecies of the impala have been recognised: the common impala and the black-faced . They are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg , while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg . Both are characterised.. more

Similar species: Even-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Living Wild
View Living Wild's profile

By Living Wild

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 5, 2015. Captured Mar 29, 2014 17:15 in D2874, Namibia.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  • f/9.0
  • 1/395s
  • ISO400
  • 439mm