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Springbok - Double Jump A pair of Springbok jump into the air simultaneously.  As seen in the wilds of Namibia, southwestern Africa. <br />
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Springbok antelope - the name implies that they jump, or spring a lot - in Dutch and Afrikaans.  This lovely antelope is extremely tough and appearances are deceiving.  They can survive without water for up to 4 days.  A rarity.  They are adapted to desert environments, and this photo does not do true justice to their real natural surroundings (they are supposed to be in the desert).  <br />
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Springbok is also the National Emblem of the South African rugby team - The Springboks.  This in-itself stamps out the authority and love that this species has in Southern Africa.  <br />
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The ram&#039;s horns are thicker than the ewes - so in this photo I would say the one closest to us is a young ram, probably with its mother ewe in the back.  He is about to be kicked out of the herd by the dominant ram. <br />
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When it comes to mating, Springbok are rather unusual.  A territorial ram will claim his &quot;area&quot;.  When a herd moves through it, he will mate.  Once the herd is out of his territory, he will not follow the herd and rather allow the next territorial ram to take care of the herd. <br />
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  Africa,Antidorcas marsupialis,Geotagged,Namibia,Springbok,Summer,action,beautiful,blur,desert-adapted,fantastic,free,horns,jump,magnificent,markings,motion,pair,plain,speed Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Springbok - Double Jump

A pair of Springbok jump into the air simultaneously. As seen in the wilds of Namibia, southwestern Africa.

Springbok antelope - the name implies that they jump, or spring a lot - in Dutch and Afrikaans. This lovely antelope is extremely tough and appearances are deceiving. They can survive without water for up to 4 days. A rarity. They are adapted to desert environments, and this photo does not do true justice to their real natural surroundings (they are supposed to be in the desert).

Springbok is also the National Emblem of the South African rugby team - The Springboks. This in-itself stamps out the authority and love that this species has in Southern Africa.

The ram's horns are thicker than the ewes - so in this photo I would say the one closest to us is a young ram, probably with its mother ewe in the back. He is about to be kicked out of the herd by the dominant ram.

When it comes to mating, Springbok are rather unusual. A territorial ram will claim his "area". When a herd moves through it, he will mate. Once the herd is out of his territory, he will not follow the herd and rather allow the next territorial ram to take care of the herd.

    comments (2)

  1. Totally synchronized, that's some incredible timing! Posted 6 years ago
    1. Yes, thank you. Although not perfectly in focus, it was absolutely, without a doubt, a lucky shot. I would guess, roughly, that I have taken around 5000 shots of Springbok in flight, trying to achieve the perfect motion shot. I am still to succeed ... Posted 6 years ago

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The springbok is a medium-sized antelope found mainly in southern and southwestern Africa. The sole member of the genus ''Antidorcas'', this bovid was first described by the German zoologist Eberhard August Wilhelm von Zimmermann in 1780. Three subspecies are identified. A slender, long-legged antelope, the springbok reaches 71 to 86 cm at the shoulder and weighs between 27 and 42 kg . Both sexes have a pair of black, 35-to-50 cm long horns that curve backwards. The springbok is characterised.. more

Similar species: Even-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Living Wild
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By Living Wild

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Uploaded Apr 5, 2015. Captured Feb 19, 2014 17:59 in D2874, Namibia.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  • f/9.0
  • 1/664s
  • ISO320
  • 403mm