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Food time Bonnet Macaque - Females of this species, like most of the mammals, breastfeed their young ones, and carry them around until they reach a certain age. The bonnet macaque, like other macaques, shares a linear dominance hierarchy; the &#039;alpha&#039; male is the most dominant male of the troop, followed by a &#039;beta&#039; male and a &#039;gamma&#039; male, and so on according to their dominance. Similarly, females also follow this linear herarchy. The male and female hierarchies are different and of a nonoverlapping or nonmixing types. Males are usually dominant over females.<br />
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The females&#039; dominance hierarchy is stable , whilst the males&#039; dominance hierarchy is very dynamic. Fights among dominant males are often resolved easily, but when they don&#039;t, things turn brutal, or even fatal. Bonnet macaque,Geotagged,India,Macaca radiata,breastfeed,monkeys,young Click/tap to enlarge

Food time

Bonnet Macaque - Females of this species, like most of the mammals, breastfeed their young ones, and carry them around until they reach a certain age. The bonnet macaque, like other macaques, shares a linear dominance hierarchy; the 'alpha' male is the most dominant male of the troop, followed by a 'beta' male and a 'gamma' male, and so on according to their dominance. Similarly, females also follow this linear herarchy. The male and female hierarchies are different and of a nonoverlapping or nonmixing types. Males are usually dominant over females.

The females' dominance hierarchy is stable , whilst the males' dominance hierarchy is very dynamic. Fights among dominant males are often resolved easily, but when they don't, things turn brutal, or even fatal.

    comments (2)

  1. Lovely scene and thank you for the information too! Posted 7 years ago
    1. Thank you, Claire. Posted 7 years ago

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The bonnet macaque is a macaque endemic to southern India. Its distribution is limited by the Indian Ocean on three sides and the Godavari and Tapti Rivers along with a related competing species of rhesus macaque in the north. Land use changes in last few decades have resulted in changes in its distribution boundaries with the rhesus macaque, raising concern for its status in the wild.

Similar species: Primates
Species identified by Avinash Krishnamurthy
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By Avinash Krishnamurthy

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Uploaded Feb 14, 2015. Captured Jan 25, 2015 13:09 in Kudur-Shivagange Road, Shivaganga, Karnataka 562111, India.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/6.3
  • 1/166s
  • ISO100
  • 250mm