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Oh, my Mynah.. These are the angry looking, Asia&#039;s native birds - Common Mynah. However, the birds in the image above may not be that common after all. While trying to identify these birds, I found out that it is visually impossible to distinguish between a Male Mynah and a female Mynah.<br />
<br />
If you look at the images of &quot;Common Mynah&quot; online, the search results will bring up the images of Mynahs that have a yellow spot around their eyes, which is completely missing in the birds in the above pic. After spending several minutes on trying to confirm if these were a different species of birds, I ended up finding one other link online that described these birds as &quot;Common Mynah&quot;. These probably are a sub-species of the common ones, but I&#039;m not certain of it.<br />
<br />
STORY:<br />
On my recent trek to &quot;Nishani BeTTa&quot;, Coorg, we had to stop at one other location near to the destination; a small village, where I found these playful little angry looking birds. At the time of clicking their images, I did not know which species these birds belonged to, until now. They were restless, and hyper active, but I don&#039;t think I heard their call.<br />
<br />
These territorial birds that are extremely well adapted to urban environments are known to perfectly mimic human speech, which I find fascinating! Acridotheres tristis,Common myna,Coorg,Fall,Geotagged,India,Karnataka,mynah,yellow spots Click/tap to enlarge

Oh, my Mynah..

These are the angry looking, Asia's native birds - Common Mynah. However, the birds in the image above may not be that common after all. While trying to identify these birds, I found out that it is visually impossible to distinguish between a Male Mynah and a female Mynah.

If you look at the images of "Common Mynah" online, the search results will bring up the images of Mynahs that have a yellow spot around their eyes, which is completely missing in the birds in the above pic. After spending several minutes on trying to confirm if these were a different species of birds, I ended up finding one other link online that described these birds as "Common Mynah". These probably are a sub-species of the common ones, but I'm not certain of it.

STORY:
On my recent trek to "Nishani BeTTa", Coorg, we had to stop at one other location near to the destination; a small village, where I found these playful little angry looking birds. At the time of clicking their images, I did not know which species these birds belonged to, until now. They were restless, and hyper active, but I don't think I heard their call.

These territorial birds that are extremely well adapted to urban environments are known to perfectly mimic human speech, which I find fascinating!

    comments (4)

  1. These birds are so bad-ass. I have a photo of one ninja-kicking a parakeet in the face in mid-air! Posted 7 years ago
    1. I believe you! These birds are known to be very territorial. The picture you have mentioned is definitely worth seeing. Please do share it with me, Ferdy. Posted 7 years ago
      1. I will share it but it will take a while, I want to share my set from Sri Lanka in chronological order, and that photos is quite a bit away still :) Posted 7 years ago
        1. I know how hard it is to sort out all the images from a wildlife trip is, and to keep track of them while sharing them online in an order! I will await for more pics from you :) Posted 7 years ago

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The common myna, sometimes spelled mynah, also sometimes known as "Indian myna", is a member of the family Sturnidae native to Asia. An omnivorous open woodland bird with a strong territorial instinct, the myna has adapted extremely well to urban environments.

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Avinash Krishnamurthy
View Avinash Krishnamurthy's profile

By Avinash Krishnamurthy

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 13, 2015. Captured Dec 14, 2014 13:59 in Madikeri-Tala Kaveri Road, Bhagamandala, Karnataka 571247, India.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/5.6
  • 1/200s
  • ISO200
  • 250mm