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Limpkin with a snail I went out canoeing with friends and we thought this was the best sighting of the day (though the canoe rental guy did not understand why it was better than the alligator!). Aramus guarauna,Geotagged,Limpkin,United States,Winter Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Limpkin with a snail

I went out canoeing with friends and we thought this was the best sighting of the day (though the canoe rental guy did not understand why it was better than the alligator!).

    comments (2)

  1. I love shots like these, showing the species, its habitat, and also its behavior. Furthermore, I recognize the rental guy's attitude a lot, it seems to be universal that so many people are only interested in mammals, iconic species and predators. Posted 7 years ago
  2. Yeah, everyone else on the river was either asking us if we had seen alligators or telling about the one they had passed that we hadn't reached yet. But I don't know how many people noticed the little gathering of mussel shells on one of the logs. (I'll upload that in a minute.)

    Seems like what people are interested in, generally speaking, tend to be things that take extremely little effort to notice, things that are in some way scary and/or overtly powerful, and things that tend to be larger/louder/brighter colored (and sometimes not even then!).

    (I do have to admit to being a cat nut though. That's the one thing I'm consistently looking for when I go to wild places. It'd be a shame to miss everything else though. I hear comments at the zoo on a regular basis about how there's nothing to see, because there aren't any elephants or tigers. I always wonder when those became the only two kinds animals on the planet.)
    Posted 7 years ago

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The Limpkin, "Aramus guarauna", is a bird that looks like a large rail but is skeletally closer to cranes. It is the only extant species in the genus "Aramus" and the family Aramidae. It is found mostly in wetlands in warm parts of the Americas, from Florida to northern Argentina. It feeds on molluscs, with the diet dominated by apple snails of the genus "Pomacea".

Similar species: Crane-like Birds
Species identified by Meryl Green
View Meryl Green's profile

By Meryl Green

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 9, 2015. Captured Feb 8, 2015 10:19 in 1000 Miami Springs Drive, Longwood, FL 32779, USA.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T3
  • f/5.6
  • 1/100s
  • ISO100
  • 250mm