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Dead Man's Fingers Here's one to add to the invasive species list, though I'm not sure if on this beach it is. It's somewhat unclear to me if it's invasive on the Pacific coast of the US or not, but it is on the Atlantic. It is thought to have originated in the oceans near Japan. Codium fragile,Geotagged,Invasive species,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Dead Man's Fingers

Here's one to add to the invasive species list, though I'm not sure if on this beach it is. It's somewhat unclear to me if it's invasive on the Pacific coast of the US or not, but it is on the Atlantic. It is thought to have originated in the oceans near Japan.

    comments (1)

  1. I was initially confused, since "Dead man's fingers" is also a fungus:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylaria_polymorpha

    And they even look a little bit alike. Great find!
    Posted 4 years ago, modified 4 years ago

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''Codium fragile'', known commonly as green sea fingers, dead man's fingers, felty fingers, forked felt-alga, stag seaweed, sponge seaweed, green sponge, green fleece, and oyster thief, is an invasive species of seaweed in the family Codiaceae.

This siphonous green alga is dark green in color. It appears as a fuzzy patch of tubular fingers. These formations hang down from rocks during low tide, hence the nickname "dead man's fingers". The "fingers" are branches up to a centimeter wide.. more

Similar species: Bryopsidales
Species identified by morpheme
View morpheme's profile

By morpheme

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 8, 2015. Captured May 1, 2014 10:35 in Tongue Point Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363, USA.
  • X-E1
  • f/8.0
  • 1/125s
  • ISO200
  • 40.7mm