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River Coyote - British Columbia This coyote was one of three we came across while speeding down the river this morning, with a total of five spotted all day. We slowed down so I could grab a photo of this one as it trotted away from our encroaching boat. They may be considered vermin by most, myself included, but they are beautiful nonetheless.<br />
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I once read a newspaper article that stated that a couple had found a coyote den with a littler pups in it. They set up a trail camera to monitor the parents&#039; activity. Within a 48 hour period, the adults had brought back 25 white-tailed deer fawns to the den. That is some serious culling of a local deer population by a veracious wild dog.  British Columbia,Canada,Canis latrans lestes,Geotagged,Mountain coyote,Winter,mammals,predators Click/tap to enlarge Country intro

River Coyote - British Columbia

This coyote was one of three we came across while speeding down the river this morning, with a total of five spotted all day. We slowed down so I could grab a photo of this one as it trotted away from our encroaching boat. They may be considered vermin by most, myself included, but they are beautiful nonetheless.

I once read a newspaper article that stated that a couple had found a coyote den with a littler pups in it. They set up a trail camera to monitor the parents' activity. Within a 48 hour period, the adults had brought back 25 white-tailed deer fawns to the den. That is some serious culling of a local deer population by a veracious wild dog.

    comments (6)

  1. 25....that's an incredible and disturbing number. Are they such easy prey? Posted 4 years ago
    1. At the time of the noted incident, the fawns would have been only days to a week old. Often the mother will leave the fawn in a hidden bed, such as tall grass or downed brush, while she goes to graze. The coyotes use their great sense of smell to sniff them out. In an area with a dense deer population, the numbers can be, as you said, disturbing. Posted 4 years ago
  2. wow what a great shot excellent Posted 4 years ago
    1. Thank you! Posted 4 years ago
  3. That's impressive. I always thought coyote mainly ate rodents. (well I suppose when there aren't fawns they probably do…) Posted 4 years ago
    1. They are pretty opportunistic. Like you suggested, I think they usually eat rodents and whatever else they can get their paws on when the deer populations are birthing. When I was a kid, my mom would sometimes throw dinner scraps and such out the back door and we would sometimes see coyotes actually come into the yard to eat them...Our dogs would freak and chase them off. Posted 4 years ago

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The Mountain coyote (Canis latrans lestes), also known as the Great Basin coyote, is a subspecies of coyote native to British Columbia and southeastern Alberta south to Utah and Nevada. It is similar to ''C. l. latrans'', but has lighter-colored upper parts.

Similar species: Carnivorans
Species identified by travismorhardt
View travismorhardt's profile

By travismorhardt

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 24, 2015. Captured Jan 23, 2015 09:49 in Nicks Island Road, Creston, BC V0B 1G7, Canada.
  • NIKON D3300
  • f/5.3
  • 10/6400s
  • ISO1600
  • 240mm