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Black Rhinoceros - Powerful A Rare and Endangered Black Rhino bull.  This specific species (Diceros bicornis) is nearing extinction due to poaching.  Worldwide, their numbers are now in the 2500 region.  Conservation efforts are in a critical stage.   Black rhinoceros,Diceros bicornis,endangered,horn,impressive,magnificent,powerful,rare,species Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Black Rhinoceros - Powerful

A Rare and Endangered Black Rhino bull. This specific species (Diceros bicornis) is nearing extinction due to poaching. Worldwide, their numbers are now in the 2500 region. Conservation efforts are in a critical stage.

    comments (6)

  1. What a powerful portrait. His facial expression somehow tells of the poor state of his species. Posted 5 years ago
    1. Thanks a lot. Indeed, mankind is but a ruthless creature that dominates the top of the food chain. Posted 5 years ago
  2. Sad and lovely, do you know how its ears got shredded? Posted 5 years ago
    1. Thanks for the comment.
      Nature Conservation (Fish and Wildlife in Namibia) use to do ear notching, basically assigning every rhino a number, like an identification of each animal. Each animal then has his own "Birth Certificate", indicating date, parents, DNA samples etc. etc. It is a very organized system today, with micro and satellite chipping taking the place of the previous ear notching. Drones cover National Parks on a 24 hr basis, detecting change in heart beat, blood pressure etc. If anything goes wrong (health wise), a thousand alarms goes off and a small army is deployed via chopper to investigate. Unfortunately for poachers, the days of peaceful investigations are drawing to a close when it comes to rhino poaching. They are met with a hail of fire these days ...
      Posted 5 years ago
  3. Oh my goodness that is amazing, thank you for sharing that. I wish they would do something similar in SA but drones are not allowed here, I don't know if they do chipping etc., lets hope so. Remarkable and scary the lengths people are having to go to to save our precious rhinos, locally they are being dehorned, but they still get killed. It breaks my heart, even orphaned babies in sanctuaries are being killed. Will it ever end? Posted 5 years ago
    1. Yes, RSA is facing a dire dilemma. I belief it is now around 3.5 rhinos a day. The meetings I have attended (with SA delegates) it was mentioned a few times that poachers take this attitude (of shooting de-horned rhinos and even calves) as matter of not having to follow the same track in the future. A simple case of mathematics and effort.

      During the most recent security meeting, it was said that the "equalizing point" is 2016 (when births and deaths are the same). Within the same year (2016) the "tipping point" will also be reached ... where deaths exceed growth.

      Also, recent rather confidential stats indicate 72 poachers have been shot and killed in RSA ... interesting stats to say the least. 90 % of those fatalities occurred within the Kruger and entailed Mozambique citizens. That is the major problem faced ... the poachers are caught (or shot), while the "fat cats" (buyers, traders) have a zero arrest rate. It will continue.

      In Namibia, the National Defense Force has been instructed to "assist" with rhino poaching through a Cabinet decision. We are fortunate that our Government is very pro wildlife. Pure aggression and fatal consequences is all that is left to deter poachers. High risk made even higher.
      Posted 5 years ago

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The black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros, is a species of rhinoceros, native to the eastern and central areas of Africa including Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroon, South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Angola. Although the rhino was referred to as ''black'', it is actually more of a grey/brown/white color in appearance.

The other African rhinoceros is the white rhinoceros. These common names are misleading, as those two species are not really distinguishable by color. The word ''white''.. more

Similar species: Odd-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Living Wild
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By Living Wild

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 4, 2015. Captured Aug 9, 2012 16:42.
  • Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  • f/7.1
  • 1/512s
  • ISO250
  • 300mm