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Cape Wagtail - Motacilla capensis The Cape Wagtail (Motacilla capensis) is a small passerine bird in the family Motacillidae, which includes the wagtails, pipits and longclaws.<br />
This species breeds in much of Africa from eastern Zaire and Angola across to Kenya and south to the Cape in South Africa.<br />
This is an insectivorous bird of open country, often near habitation and water. It prefers bare areas or short grass for feeding, where it can see and pursue its prey. In urban areas it has adapted to foraging in gardens or paved areas such as car parks. Pairs make bulky nests in crevices in natural and man-made structures, and lay up to seven eggs.<br />
The Cape Wagtail is a slender bird, 19 Cape Wagtail,Geotagged,Motacilla capensis,Namibia,cape wagtail,motacilla capensis,motacillidae,namibia,passeriformes Click/tap to enlarge Country intro

Cape Wagtail - Motacilla capensis

The Cape Wagtail (Motacilla capensis) is a small passerine bird in the family Motacillidae, which includes the wagtails, pipits and longclaws.
This species breeds in much of Africa from eastern Zaire and Angola across to Kenya and south to the Cape in South Africa.
This is an insectivorous bird of open country, often near habitation and water. It prefers bare areas or short grass for feeding, where it can see and pursue its prey. In urban areas it has adapted to foraging in gardens or paved areas such as car parks. Pairs make bulky nests in crevices in natural and man-made structures, and lay up to seven eggs.
The Cape Wagtail is a slender bird, 19

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The Cape Wagtail is a small passerine bird in the family Motacillidae, which includes the wagtails, pipits and longclaws.

This species breeds in much of Africa from eastern Zaire and Angola across to Kenya and south to the Cape in South Africa.

This is an insectivorous bird of open country, often near habitation and water. It prefers bare areas or short grass for feeding, where it can see and pursue its prey. In urban areas it has adapted to foraging in gardens or paved areas.. more

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Massimiliano Maxfear Sticca
View Massimiliano Maxfear Sticca's profile

By Massimiliano Maxfear Sticca

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Uploaded Dec 28, 2014. Captured Aug 30, 2012 16:18 in Unnamed Road, Namibia.
  • NIKON D3S
  • f/8.0
  • 10/12500s
  • ISO800
  • 500mm