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What are you lookin' at? Gaur AKA Indian Bison (Bos gaurus) - One of the vegetarian, mighty beasts of Indian jungles. These beautiful, extremely powerful, heavy but agile creatures are the largest extant bovine and is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. Their body length can range between 8.2 to 10.8 ft (excl. tail), and their height ranges between 5.41 to 7.22 ft (at the shoulder). They weigh anywhere between 650 to 1,000 kg (1,430 to 2,200 lb) with an occasional large bull weighing up to 1,500 kg (3,300 lb).<br />
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Males are about 1/4th larger and heavier than females. Adult males may be solitary, while the Gaur herds are led by female Gaurs (Matriarch). During the peak of the breeding season, unattached males wander widely in search of receptive females. No serious fighting between males has been recorded, with size being the major factor in determining dominance. Males make a mating call of clear, resonant tones which may carry for more than 1.6 km (0.99 mi). Gaur have also been known to make a whistling snort as an alarm call, and a low, cow-like moo.<br />
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Due to their formidable size, they have very few natural enemies. Leopards and packs of Dholes usually hunt down the unguarded calves or unhealthy Gaurs. Only adult Tigers and salt water Crocodiles have been reported to bring down a fully grown, adult Gaur.<br />
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The Gaur in the pic is a female. Bos gaurus,Gaur,Geotagged,India,forest,india,indian bison,jungle,wild Click/tap to enlarge

What are you lookin' at?

Gaur AKA Indian Bison (Bos gaurus) - One of the vegetarian, mighty beasts of Indian jungles. These beautiful, extremely powerful, heavy but agile creatures are the largest extant bovine and is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. Their body length can range between 8.2 to 10.8 ft (excl. tail), and their height ranges between 5.41 to 7.22 ft (at the shoulder). They weigh anywhere between 650 to 1,000 kg (1,430 to 2,200 lb) with an occasional large bull weighing up to 1,500 kg (3,300 lb).

Males are about 1/4th larger and heavier than females. Adult males may be solitary, while the Gaur herds are led by female Gaurs (Matriarch). During the peak of the breeding season, unattached males wander widely in search of receptive females. No serious fighting between males has been recorded, with size being the major factor in determining dominance. Males make a mating call of clear, resonant tones which may carry for more than 1.6 km (0.99 mi). Gaur have also been known to make a whistling snort as an alarm call, and a low, cow-like moo.

Due to their formidable size, they have very few natural enemies. Leopards and packs of Dholes usually hunt down the unguarded calves or unhealthy Gaurs. Only adult Tigers and salt water Crocodiles have been reported to bring down a fully grown, adult Gaur.

The Gaur in the pic is a female.

    comments (5)

  1. Really appreciate your detailed descriptions, it makes the photo so much more interesting. Posted 8 years ago
    1. Thank you, Claire.

      Photos without proper description are like people without past. Although they are sometimes interesting and good, they are in-complete.
      Posted 8 years ago
      1. Well said :) Posted 8 years ago
        1. That is how I feel. The only times I ignore the description part is when I'm not in the mood to write, or when I have less time. I make it a point to fill the column with useful information later on :) Posted 8 years ago
          1. You're being an example in that. Just look at this photo. It's not a photo, it's a story, a spotting, and a piece of education. That is exactly what JungleDragon is designed to be. Posted 8 years ago

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The gaur, also called Indian bison, is the largest extant bovine and is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. The species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List since 1986, as the population decline in parts of the species' range is likely to be well over 70% during the last three generations.

Similar species: Even-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Avinash Krishnamurthy
View Avinash Krishnamurthy's profile

By Avinash Krishnamurthy

All rights reserved
Uploaded Sep 10, 2014. Captured May 7, 2011 18:18 in Unnamed Road, Karnataka 643206, India.
  • COOLPIX P100
  • f/6.3
  • 1/30s
  • ISO229
  • 28.8mm