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Bleeding tooth fungus Found another one of these little jewels, maybe it is my imagination but this one looks like a little tree monster with arms ready to grab you and suck you into that drooling mouth. Scared me! Fall,Geotagged,South Africa,Spring,forest,fungi,hydnellum,mushroom,south africa Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Bleeding tooth fungus

Found another one of these little jewels, maybe it is my imagination but this one looks like a little tree monster with arms ready to grab you and suck you into that drooling mouth. Scared me!

    comments (6)

  1. Claire, was this photo made in South Africa? Wiki says:
    "Reports from Iran in 2008 and Korea in 2010 were the first outside Europe and North America."
    Is this the first find in Africa?
    Posted 5 years ago
  2. Yes, I took the photo here in South Africa. It is probably introduced and Wiki is out of date. The other photo I asked to be identified by an expert and he confirmed it. Googling also reveals other specimens in South Africa, so much as I would love to have found a new species to this country, it is not the case! Posted 5 years ago
  3. I'm very happy to see another appearance of this incredible fungi, and again the flash light really brings out the best of this jewel. Well done! Posted 5 years ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy, probably overdone it on the flash, but like you say, it brings out the 'jewels'! Posted 5 years ago
      1. I don't think it is overdone. However, as I know you're open to experimentation, I wonder what you think of this:

        http://www.ferdychristant.com/blog//archive/DOMM-9EFS6F

        In summary, decouple the flash and create side-light, back-light, any creative light. The great thing about fungi is that it a subject for which you actually have time to do such setups. Could be fun to try?

        Personally, I'm a fan of side-light, as it appears relatively natural and brings out the maximum contrast, detail and depth of a subject. I should add that the trip I describe is actually the only one in which I did this, definitely not yet part of my routine.
        Posted 5 years ago
  4. I have actually read this before when you first posted your side lit fungi photos and I must say i was very impressed. I suppose I am a nervous and slow learner and I have yet to even try off camera flash, but now you have inspired me to give it a go! As you so rightly say, fungi is a great subject, it doesn't jump around, fly or even sway in the wind. Now I just wait for these thunderclouds to hopefully go away! Posted 5 years ago

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''Hydnellum peckii'' is an inedible fungus, and a member of the genus ''Hydnellum'' of the family Bankeraceae. It is a hydnoid species, producing spores on the surface of vertical spines or tooth-like projections that hang from the undersurface of the fruit bodies. It is found in North America, Europe, and was recently discovered in Iran and Korea . ''Hydnellum peckii'' is a mycorrhizal species, and forms mutually beneficial relationships with a variety of coniferous trees, growing on the ground.. more

Similar species: Thelephorales
Species identified by Claire Hamilton
View Claire Hamilton's profile

By Claire Hamilton

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 7, 2014. Captured May 4, 2014 13:09 in Unnamed Road, South Africa.
  • Canon EOS 70D
  • f/18.0
  • 1/197s
  • ISO100
  • 100mm