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Greenland Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe leucorhoa) In April of this year, I posted a photo and video on Jungledragon of a pair of Northern Wheatear passing belatedly  through Brighton (or so I thought) on their migration to the north/north west of the UK: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/133908/northern_wheatear_oenanthe_oenanthe.html" title="Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/4367/133908_thumb.JPG?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1672876810&Signature=jWQpje7VCyViY0iqDqlyukzGVo0%3D" width="200" height="116" alt="Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Only the second time I&#039;ve ever seen this beautiful ground foraging bird as it&#039;s usually a rare  and brief visiter to Sussex, stopping as it sometimes does in early March on it&#039;s inward migration from Africa on its way to the north of the British Isles and beyond.<br />
<br />
Although late, it would be too optimistic i think, to believe there may be nesting couples nearby.............but you never know?<br />
<br />
More information here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcNK4mUo5RY        Geotagged,Northern wheatear,Oenanthe oenanthe,Spring,United Kingdom" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
This weekend past. I spotted this lone Wheatear close to my house a good month after I would have expected it to have passed through.<br />
<br />
This seemed too much of a coincidence, as well as remarkably lucky, so I did some further investigation and discovered the perfectly logical explanation.<br />
<br />
The clue is in the species title above, but for the full story, watch this video and read the commentary that goes with it: <section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/UHzJCEwCI2w?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section>  Fall,Geotagged,Northern wheatear,Oenanthe oenanthe,United Kingdom Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Greenland Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe leucorhoa)

In April of this year, I posted a photo and video on Jungledragon of a pair of Northern Wheatear passing belatedly through Brighton (or so I thought) on their migration to the north/north west of the UK:

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Only the second time I've ever seen this beautiful ground foraging bird as it's usually a rare  and brief visiter to Sussex, stopping as it sometimes does in early March on it's inward migration from Africa on its way to the north of the British Isles and beyond.<br />
<br />
Although late, it would be too optimistic i think, to believe there may be nesting couples nearby.............but you never know?<br />
<br />
More information here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcNK4mUo5RY        Geotagged,Northern wheatear,Oenanthe oenanthe,Spring,United Kingdom


This weekend past. I spotted this lone Wheatear close to my house a good month after I would have expected it to have passed through.

This seemed too much of a coincidence, as well as remarkably lucky, so I did some further investigation and discovered the perfectly logical explanation.

The clue is in the species title above, but for the full story, watch this video and read the commentary that goes with it:

    comments (3)

  1. Cool! Posted 2 months ago
  2. Very informative Posted 2 months ago
    1. It was one of those unexpected reveleations that seem quite obvious once explained.

      Nature is SO cool!

      Posted 2 months ago

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The northern wheatear or wheatear is a small passerine bird that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family Turdidae, but is now more generally considered to be an Old World flycatcher, Muscicapidae. It is the most widespread member of the wheatear genus "Oenanthe" in Europe and Asia.

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Christine Young
View Philip Booker's profile

By Philip Booker

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 4, 2022. Captured Oct 3, 2022 14:08 in 93 Staplefield Dr, Brighton BN2 4RH, UK.
  • DSC-RX10M4
  • f/5.6
  • 1/1000s
  • ISO100
  • 220mm