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A Red-dotted Planthopper (Lystra lanata) perched on a trunk Until Ferdy pointed it out in a comment in this observation:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/129758/a_planthopper_lystra_pulverulenta_showing_off_its_waxy_filaments.html" title="A planthopper (Lystra pulverulenta) showing off its waxy filaments"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2539/129758_thumb.jpeg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1663804810&Signature=h09FsWil%2BwPHI4MOAvtEpcRN7ME%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="A planthopper (Lystra pulverulenta) showing off its waxy filaments These are also called Wax-tailed Planthoppers or Waxy-tailed Planthoppers, but that name is also used for their cousin Pterodictya reticularis (https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/14717/wax-tailed_planthopper_pterodictya_reticularis.html) Geotagged,Lystra pulverulenta,Peru,Summer" /></a></figure><br />
I didn&#039;t realize that there were two very similar species in this area. This one has smaller white patches on the wings. Geotagged,Lystra lanata,Peru,Red-dotted Planthopper,Summer Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

A Red-dotted Planthopper (Lystra lanata) perched on a trunk

Until Ferdy pointed it out in a comment in this observation:

A planthopper (Lystra pulverulenta) showing off its waxy filaments These are also called Wax-tailed Planthoppers or Waxy-tailed Planthoppers, but that name is also used for their cousin Pterodictya reticularis (https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/14717/wax-tailed_planthopper_pterodictya_reticularis.html) Geotagged,Lystra pulverulenta,Peru,Summer

I didn't realize that there were two very similar species in this area. This one has smaller white patches on the wings.

    comments (8)

  1. Yay, there it is, genus fully documented! Posted 5 months ago
    1. Just a few more genera to go! Posted 5 months ago
      1. I really love how documenting species is pretty much endless. For example, we're doing quite well on butterflies and moths. By documenting some 4,000. Out of....150,000.

        150,000 known ones. In one place in Ecuador the owner of the lodge said that a group of researchers in his area discover an average of 17 new moth species. EVERY NIGHT. They don't have the resources to properly describe them.
        Posted 5 months ago
        1. That is so great. I love how unimaginably biodiverse the world is. (Now let's help try to keep it that way!) Posted 5 months ago
          1. Sounds like a plan! Posted 5 months ago
  2. Came across it in my own set:

    Red-dotted Planthopper, Sani Lodge, Ecuador  Ecuador,Ecuador 2021,Geotagged,Lystra lanata,Red-dotted Planthopper,Sani Lodge,South America,Spring,World,Yasuni National Park

    Interestingly, we both photographed it without the wax, which is atypical. I wonder if its a sub-adult or different sex.
    Posted 5 months ago, modified 5 months ago
    1. Sure enough. I think the waxy filaments are very fragile and break off a lot, so that's another possibility Posted 5 months ago
      1. Didn't think of that, sounds more logical, thanks. Posted 5 months ago

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''Lystra lanata'', the red-dotted planthopper, is a species from the genus ''Lystra''. Originally described by Carl Linnaeus by its basionym ''Cicada lanata''.

Similar species: True Bugs
Species identified by John Sullivan
View John Sullivan's profile

By John Sullivan

All rights reserved
Uploaded Mar 2, 2022. Captured Jan 23, 2022 14:08 in FRCC+H9 Mazán District, Peru.
  • iPhone 12 Pro
  • f/1.6
  • 1/309s
  • ISO32
  • 4.2mm