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Deer Tick (Male) - Ixodes scapularis Adult, male blacklegged ticks have a long, dark scutum that covers most of their dorsal surface and 8 legs. Male ticks basically only live to mate, and they die when they either run out of energy or sperm, whichever comes first. They do take tiny bloodmeals, but they don&#039;t become engorged like females do. They just ingest a bit to keep them going, which is why they don&#039;t transmit pathogens (they don&#039;t feed long enough to acquire or transmit them...at least from what we know at this point). Males still quest (where they stand on vegetation and wave their legs in the air hoping to grab onto a host), just like the females do - probably because they are seeking to mate and they are hoping females will be on whatever they can grab onto.<br />
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The lifecycle of blacklegged ticks generally lasts two years. During this time, they go through four life stages: egg, six-legged larva, eight-legged nymph, and eight-legged adult. They are three-host ticks, which means that they must have one bloodmeal during each life stage (larva, nymph, adult) in order to survive. In addition, blacklegged ticks are the main vector of Lyme disease in North America. They can also transmit other diseases such as Babesiosis, Powassan, and Anaplasmosis. However, males do not feed and therefore don&#039;t transmit disease.<br />
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Habitat: Deciduous forest Blacklegged Tick,Fall,Geotagged,Ixodes,Ixodes scapularis,Ixodidae,United States,deer tick,hard tick,male tick Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Deer Tick (Male) - Ixodes scapularis

Adult, male blacklegged ticks have a long, dark scutum that covers most of their dorsal surface and 8 legs. Male ticks basically only live to mate, and they die when they either run out of energy or sperm, whichever comes first. They do take tiny bloodmeals, but they don't become engorged like females do. They just ingest a bit to keep them going, which is why they don't transmit pathogens (they don't feed long enough to acquire or transmit them...at least from what we know at this point). Males still quest (where they stand on vegetation and wave their legs in the air hoping to grab onto a host), just like the females do - probably because they are seeking to mate and they are hoping females will be on whatever they can grab onto.

The lifecycle of blacklegged ticks generally lasts two years. During this time, they go through four life stages: egg, six-legged larva, eight-legged nymph, and eight-legged adult. They are three-host ticks, which means that they must have one bloodmeal during each life stage (larva, nymph, adult) in order to survive. In addition, blacklegged ticks are the main vector of Lyme disease in North America. They can also transmit other diseases such as Babesiosis, Powassan, and Anaplasmosis. However, males do not feed and therefore don't transmit disease.

Habitat: Deciduous forest

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''Ixodes scapularis'' is commonly known as the deer tick or blacklegged tick, and in some parts of the USA as the bear tick. It is a hard-bodied tick of the eastern and northern Midwestern United States. It is a vector for several diseases of animals, including humans and is known as the deer tick owing to its habit of parasitizing the white-tailed deer. It is also known to parasitize mice, lizards, migratory birds, etc. especially while the tick is in the larva or nymph stage.

Similar species: Ticks
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

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Uploaded Nov 23, 2021. Captured Nov 10, 2020 17:10 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 90D
  • f/2.8
  • 1/166s
  • ISO1000
  • 100mm