JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Guyanan Red Howler Monkey (Alouatta macconnelli) A Guyanan Red Howler Monkey I saw yesterday afternoon on the western side of Trinidad, a place commonly visited for hiking and other outdoor sports. I was really close to the troop of monkeys, around 2 metres away from one of them when someone drove past with their music really loud, prompting the monkey to run away. The encounter was certainly fun while it lasted though! Alouatta macconnelli,Animalia,Animals,Caribbean,Guyanan Red Howler Monkey,Guyanan red howler,Mammalia,Mammals,Trinidad and Tobago Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Guyanan Red Howler Monkey (Alouatta macconnelli)

A Guyanan Red Howler Monkey I saw yesterday afternoon on the western side of Trinidad, a place commonly visited for hiking and other outdoor sports. I was really close to the troop of monkeys, around 2 metres away from one of them when someone drove past with their music really loud, prompting the monkey to run away. The encounter was certainly fun while it lasted though!

    comments (14)

  1. Aww! What a bummer it got scared off. But, an amazing encounter for sure! Great shot, Wesley!

    I was curious about their howls and found this:


    I don't know if the monkey in the video is the same species, but it was very impressive!
    Posted 2 months ago, modified 2 months ago
    1. Hey Christine, not sure if it's the same species but definitely the same sound! It's quite easy to hear them from a far distance but when they're silent they're a bit difficult to find. Yesterday I noticed rustling in the trees from afar and that's how I found them:) Posted 2 months ago
      1. Lol, that's amazing! My cats are still recovering from hearing it blasting through my computer speakers. ;P Posted 2 months ago
        1. I hope they're fine:) Posted 2 months ago
          1. Completely recovered! They grew up alongside my two boys, so they are used to loud noise. ;P Posted 2 months ago
  2. Amazing species intro, thanks for sharing! Posted 2 months ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy! Posted 2 months ago
  3. Good to see some of your work again. Was worried you might have had a run in with Covid. Posted 2 months ago
    1. Thanks Ernst! No covid, just a lot of assignments in university which takes up a lot of time:) Posted 2 months ago
      1. Yes a lot of time but you will be one very smart one soon. Posted 2 months ago
  4. Wonderful Wesley Posted 2 months ago
  5. Today's Facebook post:

    An average human conversation registers at 60 decibels (dB). A loud rock concert is about 120 dB. Impressively, the call of a male howler monkey can be as loud as 140 dB, making it one of the loudest land animals on earth!
    There are 15 different species of howler monkeys in the genus Alouatta, all of which are native to the rainforests of Central and South America. They are arboreal, social, sedentary, and folivorous -- 75% of their diet consists of leaves with fruit and flowers making up the remainder.

    As their common name suggests, howler monkeys howl. Loudly. A male’s guttural, cacophonous call can be heard through the dense jungle for 5 km (3 mi)! Such thunderous noise is shocking, especially considering the average howler monkey only weighs about 7 kg (15 lb). Their vocalizations communicate location, protect territory, and attract mates. Females seem to prefer the males with the deepest howls. A fierce, imposing call suggests that a male is large and would be a good provider and protector.

    A male’s vocalizations are produced by his inflatable, resonating throat and enlarged hyoid bone. The bigger the hyoid, the deeper the howl. But, it is an energetically expensive bone to make. Individuals with large hyoids have to compensate by having smaller structures elsewhere. And, here’s where it gets awkward…The larger a male’s hyoid bone, the smaller are his testicles. And, unfortunately, small testicles mean less sperm production. It’s an anatomical trade-off in which they trade testicles for decibels. It’s simply not possible to produce a large hyoid AND large testes. So, deep calls equal small balls.

    But, there is some strategy involved. Males with big hyoids and small testicles tend to have small harems in which they are the only male. They have exclusive access to the females and there is no sperm competition. But, males with small hyoids and large testicles live in groups with multiple males. They can afford to live in multi-male troops because they can compete with other males simply by making more sperm, allowing for repeated and hopefully successful mating. {Guyanan Red Howler Monkey (Alouatta macconnelli) spotted in Trinidad and Tobago by Wesley Goorachan} #JungleDragon #Howlermonkey #Alouattamacconnelli

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife
    Posted one month ago
  6. Excellent capture Wesley Posted one month ago
    1. Thank you so much! Posted one month ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

The Guyanan red howler is a species of howler monkey, a type of New World monkey, native to Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad, French Guiana, Venezuela and Brazil.

Similar species: Primates
Species identified by Wesley Goorachan
View Wesley Goorachan's profile

By Wesley Goorachan

All rights reserved
Uploaded Sep 20, 2021. Captured Sep 19, 2021 16:57.
  • Canon EOS Rebel T6
  • f/6.3
  • 1/166s
  • ISO400
  • 600mm