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Hummingbird Flower Mites in Panterpe insignis beak (may be Neharpyrhynchus trochilinus) I don&#039;t add species because is diffcult for me to verify it. I assume this could be the sp baed on its hummingbird host. Many hummingbirds are carriers of mites that use the hummingbird to travel from flower to flower. Each flower is like a bus stop and a feeding station for them. Read more on this curious behavior here: <br />
<a href="https://biodiversity.uconn.edu/rob-colwells-mites/" rel="nofollow">https://biodiversity.uconn.edu/rob-colwells-mites/</a><br />
<a href="https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/2276/" rel="nofollow">https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/2276/</a> Costa Rica,Fiery-throated hummingbird,Geotagged,Neharpyrhynchus,Neharpyrhynchus trochilinus,Panterpe insignis,Spring,mites Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Hummingbird Flower Mites in Panterpe insignis beak (may be Neharpyrhynchus trochilinus)

I don't add species because is diffcult for me to verify it. I assume this could be the sp baed on its hummingbird host. Many hummingbirds are carriers of mites that use the hummingbird to travel from flower to flower. Each flower is like a bus stop and a feeding station for them. Read more on this curious behavior here:
https://biodiversity.uconn.edu/rob-colwells-mites/
https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/2276/

    comments (6)

  1. You could ID it for the hummingbird - it won't affect the searchability of the tag or title for the mites. Posted 3 months ago
  2. Cool! I've never heard of this before. Posted 3 months ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    The tiny, white dots around the beak of this hummingbird are mites! Hummingbird flower mites feed on the nectar and pollen of the flowers that hummingbirds visit.

    Mites can't fly, so they move from flower to flower by hitching a ride on visiting hummingbirds. This behavior is called phoresy. When the local food supply runs low, the mites scramble up the beak of a visiting hummingbird, latching onto its nostrils. They have to be super fast since a hummingbird only lingers for a couple seconds. Many mites are adapted to feast only on specific flowers, and they rely on olfaction to determine which species of plant their hummingbird is visiting. So, they only de-bird at the correct flowers.

    This arrangement is obviously very convenient for the mites, who would otherwise have to walk to find new flowers. This isn't ideal for the hummingbirds, though, because mites have voracious appetites and can devour half a flower’s nectar! Hummingbirds harboring hitchiking mites have to visit more flowers in order to meet their own staggering nutritional needs. To put it in perspective, if humans had similar energy requirements, we’d have to consume 155,000 calories a day! So, the mites and hummingbirds are competing for a flower's resources, with the birds unwittingly assisting their freeloading opponents! {Hummingbird flower mites on Panterpe insignis, photographed by Patomarazul in Costa Rica} #JungleDragon #Hummingbirdflowermites

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife
    Posted 3 months ago
    1. Many thanks for this beautiful summary! Posted 2 months ago
      1. You're very welcome, Marta! Posted 2 months ago
  4. Love the detail in the feathers! Posted 29 days ago

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The fiery-throated hummingbird is a medium-sized hummingbird which breeds only in the mountains of Costa Rica and western Panama. It is the only member of the genus ''Panterpe''.

Similar species: Swifts And Hummingbirds
Species identified by Patomarazul
View Patomarazul's profile

By Patomarazul

All rights reserved
Uploaded Sep 4, 2021. Captured Apr 22, 2014 15:43 in San José Province, Copey District, Costa Rica.
  • NIKON D7000
  • f/5.6
  • 10/5000s
  • ISO800
  • 250mm