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Castor Bean Tick questing, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/120469/castor_bean_tick_on_floor_heeswijk-dinther_netherlands.html" title="Castor Bean Tick on floor, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/120469_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1658361610&Signature=ehZiAaWHCbxJs%2BJqKhirjbHHkNU%3D" width="200" height="172" alt="Castor Bean Tick on floor, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands Adult female, about 3mm. More background info here:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/120468/castor_bean_tick_probing_heeswijk-dinther_netherlands.html Castor Bean Tick,Europe,Heeswijk-Dinther,Ixodes ricinus,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
A situational shot to display typical behavior. This is an adult female Ixodes ricinus, the most common tick found in the Netherlands. Few ticks make it to adulthood, as they require at least one blood meal for each life stage, which significantly reduces odds. The solution is for the adult female to lay an enormous amount of eggs after her last blood meal, which she is in the process of finding on the photo.<br />
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Most tick species are blind, and compensate with a highly sophisticated detection organ that enables it to detect an incoming target from a distance (supposedly by vibration, scent and even the composition of air). This detection in advance is needed for timing the attack. Contrary to popular belief, ticks don&#039;t jump, they cross over to their victim by walking, so there has to be a brief moment of direct contact at least.<br />
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For a fascinating overview of their entire life cycle, have a look at this excellent video:<br />
<br />
<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/WpOyWesQtgc?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section> Castor Bean Tick,Europe,Heeswijk-Dinther,Ixodes ricinus,Netherlands,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Castor Bean Tick questing, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands

Castor Bean Tick on floor, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands Adult female, about 3mm. More background info here:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/120468/castor_bean_tick_probing_heeswijk-dinther_netherlands.html Castor Bean Tick,Europe,Heeswijk-Dinther,Ixodes ricinus,Netherlands,World

A situational shot to display typical behavior. This is an adult female Ixodes ricinus, the most common tick found in the Netherlands. Few ticks make it to adulthood, as they require at least one blood meal for each life stage, which significantly reduces odds. The solution is for the adult female to lay an enormous amount of eggs after her last blood meal, which she is in the process of finding on the photo.

Most tick species are blind, and compensate with a highly sophisticated detection organ that enables it to detect an incoming target from a distance (supposedly by vibration, scent and even the composition of air). This detection in advance is needed for timing the attack. Contrary to popular belief, ticks don't jump, they cross over to their victim by walking, so there has to be a brief moment of direct contact at least.

For a fascinating overview of their entire life cycle, have a look at this excellent video:

    comments (4)

  1. Cool pic! The behavior the tick is performing is called 'questing'. I'm not sure if you meant that instead of 'probing'.

    The sensory organs you alluded to are called Haller's organs. They are located on the tips of the tick's front legs. They look like tiny pits when viewed under a microscope, but the exact morphology differs between species and even between the males and females of a single species.
    Posted 10 months ago
    1. Oh, and fun fact: If you blow on the tick's front legs, you can make it start questing. Posted 10 months ago
    2. Thanks for that. I knew there was a term for it, may have vaguely remembered it from one of your posts, yet forgot the exact word. Posted 10 months ago
      1. It's hard to remember. Dave recently referred to questing as 'sequestering'. Posted 10 months ago

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''Ixodes ricinus'', the castor bean tick, is a chiefly European species of hard-bodied tick. It may reach a length of 11 mm when engorged with a blood meal, and can transmit both bacterial and viral pathogens such as the causative agents of Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis.

Similar species: Ticks
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 19, 2021. Captured Jul 18, 2021 14:53.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/5.6
  • 1/60s
  • ISO125
  • 50mm