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Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) Nectaring on what I&#039;m assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.<br />
<br />
It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating!<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112178/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html" title="Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3231/112178_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1627516810&Signature=wKzbLo6YsueX8vox5FyFH%2FMsmE0%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) Nectaring on what I&#039;m assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.<br />
<br />
It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating! <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112177/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112176/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html Amphion floridensis,Geotagged,Nessus sphinx,Spring,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112177/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html" title="Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3231/112177_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1627516810&Signature=0VGoXbheG8VhWi5Q3DhQ%2BRZFeS0%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) Nectaring on what I&#039;m assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.<br />
<br />
It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating! <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112178/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112176/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html Amphion floridensis,Geotagged,Nessus sphinx,Spring,United States" /></a></figure> Amphion floridensis,Geotagged,Nessus sphinx,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis)

Nectaring on what I'm assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.

It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating!

Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) Nectaring on what I'm assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.<br />
<br />
It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating! <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112177/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112176/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html Amphion floridensis,Geotagged,Nessus sphinx,Spring,United States

Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) Nectaring on what I'm assuming was stray dog feces. At a mixed forest edge.<br />
<br />
It was a struggle to photograph this moth as it was moving so quickly. The wingbeats were so fast that the air was vibrating! <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112178/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/112176/nessus_sphinx_amphion_floridensis.html Amphion floridensis,Geotagged,Nessus sphinx,Spring,United States

    comments (5)

  1. Spectacular find! I wonder if you ever tried putting out bait for moths?

    We once tried with rotten fish in Colombia. Then a vulture picked it up and that was the bait. Super successful.
    Given the food source on your photo, I might as well share another appetizing one: human urine. Or possibly any urine. Probably due to salt/minerals. Could be that you already knew this, just sharing experiences.
    Posted 2 months ago
    1. Interesting bait choice! :D I have tried some banana/liquor mash in the past-- but not in recent years (worried about critters and fire ants out here). I hadn't thought about urine, but that makes a lot of sense. I wonder if they would enjoy it more if you had a sweet meal or drink before urinating? Many butterflies love to nectar on human sweat during summer months--and will even land on you to get a drink! Posted 2 months ago
      1. Absolutely sweat is another attraction. I love how people mistake this attraction for thinking the butterfly really just happens to like them. No harm in thinking that, I guess :)

        I came to the urine conclusion after noticing how alongside roads and in national parks near reception areas, we'd find concentrated flocks of butterflies in highly specific spots. Like so:

        Tropical butterflies feeding frenzy - side view, La Planada Nature Reserve, Colombia Species:<br />
- Multiple Altinote alcione (orange body)<br />
- At least two Montane longwings (Heliconius clysonymus)<br />
- At least one Lamplight Actinote (Altinote ozomene)<br />
- At least one unknown brown-winged butterfly<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/76877/tropical_butterflies_feeding_frenzy_la_planada_nature_reserve_colombia.html Colombia,Colombia 2018,Colombia South,La Planada Nature Reserve,South America

        All hyper focusing on that tiny spot. Yet nothing of substance was there. Until it sinked in. The food source is "trucker's piss". That's why they're besides the roads.

        So looks like it's time to draw a map for Jason. We need to verify this.
        Posted 2 months ago, modified 2 months ago
        1. I don't mind being the tastiest option around for Leps :D

          That is an awesome anecdote! Jason pees outside a lot (we live out in the woods, so no one is judging LOL), so it shouldn't be hard to experiment with this. I know that the Hybrid Imported Fire Ants (Solenopsis invicta x richteri) do NOT like urine (and will move their colonies in its presence). We've been using it as a sort of natural pest control to keep them away from our garden and house area.
          Solenopsis invicta x richteri They are quite aggressive (and painful) and are taking over our living area! At the disturbed edge of a dense mixed forest. Geotagged,Red imported fire ant,Solenopsis invicta,Solenopsis invicta x richteri,Summer,United States


          Bees, wasps, and flies love it, of course!
          Posted 2 months ago, modified 2 months ago
          1. Lol clever pest control. Posted 2 months ago

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''Amphion floridensis'', the Nessus sphinx, is a day-flying moth of the family Sphingidae. The species was named by Benjamin Preston Clark in 1920. It is the only member of the genus ''Amphion'' erected by Jacob Hübner in 1819. It lives throughout the eastern United States and Canada and occasionally south into Mexico, and is one of the more commonly encountered day-flying moths in the region, easily recognized by the two bright-yellow bands across the abdomen.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 6, 2021. Captured Apr 6, 2021 11:30 in 227 Oakman Rd NE, Oakman, GA 30732, USA.
  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • f/25.0
  • 1/83s
  • ISO800
  • 100mm