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Gypsy Moth Eggs - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html" title="Gypsy Moth (Females) with Eggs"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/57133_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1623888010&Signature=l5EDoDfSnlVjPviboal6b0WUjIk%3D" width="116" height="152" alt="Gypsy Moth (Females) with Eggs Not a great shot as I took it with my cell phone! But, I wanted to upload it anyway to document the damage that these moths can do! <br />
<br />
These are female moths with their eggs. Females have white wings, a tan body, and approximately a two-inch wingspan. They cannot fly. Rather, they simply crawl to a spot near where they pupated, and wait for a male to find them to mate. After mating, female gypsy moths lay a mass of eggs. Each egg mass can hold over a hundred eggs.<br />
During the summer of 2016 in Rhode Island (northeast US), these moths, which are an invasive species, were literally everywhere. You couldn&#039;t go outside, day or night, without seeing them. All you could hear in the woods was the sound of caterpillars pooping up in the tree canopy - it sounded like rain.  Gypsy moth caterpillars wreaked havoc and caused incredible amounts of tree carnage - it was estimated that approximately 3/4 of Rhode Island&#039;s forest canopy was destroyed, making this the worst outbreak in at least 15 years. A single caterpillar can eat a square foot of leaf matter in one day - they prefer hardwoods, but will also eat conifers, many of which will not recover.   Geotagged,Gypsy Moth,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States,moth" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108637/female_gypsy_moths_-_lymantria_dispar.html" title="Female Gypsy Moths - Lymantria dispar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/108637_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1623888010&Signature=S8CFezknTyOi0SaVYNnsNeE7ZKM%3D" width="122" height="152" alt="Female Gypsy Moths - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108639/female_gypsy_moth_dead_on_her_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108638/female_gypsy_moth_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States,moth" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108639/female_gypsy_moth_dead_on_her_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html" title="Female Gypsy Moth (Dead on her Eggs) - Lymantria dispar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/108639_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1623888010&Signature=Y%2F15lRekQi1jTzq95qFSl%2B7L1u4%3D" width="110" height="152" alt="Female Gypsy Moth (Dead on her Eggs) - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108637/female_gypsy_moths_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108638/female_gypsy_moth_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108638/female_gypsy_moth_-_lymantria_dispar.html" title="Female Gypsy Moth - Lymantria dispar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/108638_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1623888010&Signature=%2FFnAw9oGf8vc3yvNwg5QK8JG2a0%3D" width="200" height="180" alt="Female Gypsy Moth - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108639/female_gypsy_moth_dead_on_her_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108637/female_gypsy_moths_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States" /></a></figure> Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States,eggs,moth eggs Click/tap to enlarge

Gypsy Moth Eggs - Lymantria dispar

I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.

For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation:

Gypsy Moth (Females) with Eggs Not a great shot as I took it with my cell phone! But, I wanted to upload it anyway to document the damage that these moths can do! <br />
<br />
These are female moths with their eggs. Females have white wings, a tan body, and approximately a two-inch wingspan. They cannot fly. Rather, they simply crawl to a spot near where they pupated, and wait for a male to find them to mate. After mating, female gypsy moths lay a mass of eggs. Each egg mass can hold over a hundred eggs.<br />
During the summer of 2016 in Rhode Island (northeast US), these moths, which are an invasive species, were literally everywhere. You couldn't go outside, day or night, without seeing them. All you could hear in the woods was the sound of caterpillars pooping up in the tree canopy - it sounded like rain.  Gypsy moth caterpillars wreaked havoc and caused incredible amounts of tree carnage - it was estimated that approximately 3/4 of Rhode Island's forest canopy was destroyed, making this the worst outbreak in at least 15 years. A single caterpillar can eat a square foot of leaf matter in one day - they prefer hardwoods, but will also eat conifers, many of which will not recover.   Geotagged,Gypsy Moth,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States,moth


Habitat: Mixed forest
Female Gypsy Moths - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108639/female_gypsy_moth_dead_on_her_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108638/female_gypsy_moth_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States,moth

Female Gypsy Moth (Dead on her Eggs) - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108637/female_gypsy_moths_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108638/female_gypsy_moth_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States

Female Gypsy Moth - Lymantria dispar I found hundreds of dead, female gypsy moths in this forest. Most were on the ground (at the base of trees), but some died on the trees right after depositing their egg masses on the bark. And, of course, I found lots of egg masses on the trees, many of which I scraped off as we are recommended to do because we have had heavy infestations in recent years that have caused massive defoliation.<br />
<br />
For more info on a recent, particularly bad infestation: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57133/gypsy_moth_females_with_eggs.html<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest  <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108639/female_gypsy_moth_dead_on_her_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108640/gypsy_moth_eggs_-_lymantria_dispar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/108637/female_gypsy_moths_-_lymantria_dispar.html Geotagged,Gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar,Summer,United States

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Lymantria dispar, the gypsy moth, are moths in the family Erebidae. Lymantria dispar covers many subspecies, subspecies identification such as L. d. dispar or L. d. japonica leaves no ambiguity in identification. Lymantria dispar subspecies have a range which covers in Europe, Africa, Asia, North America and South America.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 10, 2021. Captured Jul 31, 2020 11:23 in 91 Main St, Sharon, CT 06069, USA.
  • Canon EOS 90D
  • f/5.0
  • 1/166s
  • ISO640
  • 100mm