JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

White-marked Tussock Moth Cocoon (Orgyia leucostigma) ♂ in a crevice above my camper door. At a dense mixed forest edge. Easily identified as this species as there are the black-tipped setae which are incorporated into the cocoon! <br />
Check out Christine&#039;s photo here to get a look at the &quot;clubbed&quot; black setae (at the anterior and posterior ends of the caterpillar):<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63378/white-marked_tussock_moth_caterpillar_-_orgyia_leucostigma.html" title="White-marked tussock moth caterpillar - Orgyia leucostigma"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/63378_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1616630410&Signature=nljXuI11Zlm0%2FXKvQzMpg4gaS7E%3D" width="200" height="152" alt="White-marked tussock moth caterpillar - Orgyia leucostigma This caterpillar has been frustrating me for several years now. Each summer, I try to get a sharp, side profile shot of it, and every year, I fail. This is my best attempt so far, so I decided to post it and will keep trying until I get a clear shot.<br />
<br />
Bright red head, yellow middorsal tufts on A1-A4, and a black middorsal stripe that is flanked by yellow subdorsal stripes. It was about 3 cm long.<br />
<br />
 Spotted in a deciduous forest. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63376/white-marked_tussock_moth_caterpillar_-_orgyia_leucostigma.html Geotagged,Orgyia leucostigma,Summer,United States,White-marked tussock moth,caterpillar,orgyia" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
I&#039;m assuming this is a male cocoon as there are is no egg mass laid on top of this, but I&#039;m also wondering if this is a female coccoon-and the assassin bug nymphs possibly ate the eggs/frothy mass? There are Reduuvid exuviae all around it! Geotagged,Orgyia leucostigma,United States,White-marked tussock moth,Winter Click/tap to enlarge

White-marked Tussock Moth Cocoon (Orgyia leucostigma) ♂

in a crevice above my camper door. At a dense mixed forest edge. Easily identified as this species as there are the black-tipped setae which are incorporated into the cocoon!
Check out Christine's photo here to get a look at the "clubbed" black setae (at the anterior and posterior ends of the caterpillar):

White-marked tussock moth caterpillar - Orgyia leucostigma This caterpillar has been frustrating me for several years now. Each summer, I try to get a sharp, side profile shot of it, and every year, I fail. This is my best attempt so far, so I decided to post it and will keep trying until I get a clear shot.<br />
<br />
Bright red head, yellow middorsal tufts on A1-A4, and a black middorsal stripe that is flanked by yellow subdorsal stripes. It was about 3 cm long.<br />
<br />
 Spotted in a deciduous forest. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63376/white-marked_tussock_moth_caterpillar_-_orgyia_leucostigma.html Geotagged,Orgyia leucostigma,Summer,United States,White-marked tussock moth,caterpillar,orgyia


I'm assuming this is a male cocoon as there are is no egg mass laid on top of this, but I'm also wondering if this is a female coccoon-and the assassin bug nymphs possibly ate the eggs/frothy mass? There are Reduuvid exuviae all around it!

    comments (5)

  1. Great find! The pupa was still in there? Posted one month ago
    1. I don't know. It is really far above our door, and I really didn't want to disturb it too much. I had to reach up really high to get this shot :D Posted one month ago
      1. MAybe you will be able to witness it emerge! Posted one month ago
        1. That would be wild :O Posted one month ago
          1. Records on BG show it in Georgia as early as April in the spring. But, I have no idea if those records are of adults or not. You could use your trail cam to record the cocoon, lol. Posted one month ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Orgyia leucostigma'', the White-marked tussock moth, is a moth in the family Lymantriidae. The caterpillar is very common especially in late summer in eastern North America, as far west as Texas, Colorado, and Alberta.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 23, 2021. Captured Jan 22, 2021 16:18 in 227 Oakman Rd NE, Oakman, GA 30732, USA.
  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • f/29.0
  • 1/83s
  • ISO100
  • 100mm