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Red Tail Three Quarter Inch Ant A new species in my front yard - have never seen them before.<br />
Have been digging via search but have not been able to id this one.<br />
Some kind of Myrmecia I presume.<br />
<br />
An increasingly active nest which I first noticed the end of the Australian 2020 summer, the nest was totally quite over winter. Now mid-summer and the nest is quite busy.<br />
<br />
Very attractive ant, somewhat shy. Myrmecia,Myrmecia mandibularis,adelaide,inch ant,red tail Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Red Tail Three Quarter Inch Ant

A new species in my front yard - have never seen them before.
Have been digging via search but have not been able to id this one.
Some kind of Myrmecia I presume.

An increasingly active nest which I first noticed the end of the Australian 2020 summer, the nest was totally quite over winter. Now mid-summer and the nest is quite busy.

Very attractive ant, somewhat shy.

    comments (3)

  1. This site, which seems to sell ants, seems to have a reference very close to yours:
    https://www.ants-kalytta.com/Myrmecia-cf-mandibularis.en.html

    Basically confirms your genus ID, but perhaps interesting.
    Posted 3 months ago
    1. Indeed - looks very similar.
      Think I will ping an email to my local museum to see if I can get a positive ID.
      Also, think I need to put a small fence at the nest site - they seem a bit aggressive.

      Edit: Actually looking here it certainly appears to be Myrmecia mandibularis.
      https://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:1490b47c-2908-4093-9a84-45c4138c2fd0
      Posted 3 months ago, modified 3 months ago
      1. Great, happy that you found an ID :) Posted 3 months ago

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''Myrmecia mandibularis'' is an Australian species of ''Myrmecia''. Average sizes for the ''Myrmecia mandibularis'' is around 15-30 millimetres. They have a similar appearance to the ''Myrmecia pilosula'', except their mandibles are completely black while most of their abdomen is in an orange colour.

Described in 1858, the species is mainly found in the southern regions of Australia, and most frequently seen around Perth.

Species identified by betsuin
View betsuin's profile

By betsuin

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 18, 2021. Captured Jan 18, 2021 17:50.
  • Canon EOS Kiss X5
  • f/5.6
  • 1/83s
  • ISO250
  • 55mm