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Larva of the 24-spot Ladybird  (Subcoccinella vigintiquattuorpunctata) Possibly my toughest subject from 2020 to photograph and video, given the almost imperceptible size of the Larva, the difficulty of getting a clear view in the grass without disturbing it, and a blustery wind making reasonable focus hugely difficult to maintain.<br />
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However, we got there eventually and to see this little thing (that&#039;s a blade of grass) go about its business made it worth it:<br />
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See and read about it here: <section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hvaskL-_Cws?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section> 24-spot ladybird,Geotagged,Subcoccinella vigintiquatuorpunctata,United Kingdom Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Larva of the 24-spot Ladybird (Subcoccinella vigintiquattuorpunctata)

Possibly my toughest subject from 2020 to photograph and video, given the almost imperceptible size of the Larva, the difficulty of getting a clear view in the grass without disturbing it, and a blustery wind making reasonable focus hugely difficult to maintain.

However, we got there eventually and to see this little thing (that's a blade of grass) go about its business made it worth it:

See and read about it here:

    comments (8)

  1. You definitely did a good job! Its binomial name sure is a mouthful. Posted one year ago
    1. Christine

      It's a beauty, isn't it?
      It reminds me of one of the English languages great ironies:
      The word 'Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia' is used to describe 'a fear of long words'.

      I wonder if there's a word for 'a fear of irony'?

      PK

      Posted one year ago
      1. Haha! Posted one year ago
  2. Remarkable stability, and beautiful back light on the subject! Posted one year ago
    1. Ferdy

      Thank you. It involved a lot of failed attempts, on a blisteringly hot day.

      I hate it when people try to photograph or see something of note and in their enthusiasm trample down or damage the very environment needed by whatever it is they have come to see. The Long-tailed blue last year being a case in point, when a small group of long time enthusiasts who should have known better were blindly running around the relatively small patch containing this (for us) very rare butterfly.

      The point being, I was determined to get something without taking the easy option of clearing a patch of grass which may well have contained more larva.

      If you miss out, you miss out, but don't harm the subject.

      On this day persistence paid off, but I didn't quite realise until I saw the videos again the other day.

      The light was not an act of planning, but you're right it works wonderfully.

      PK
      Posted one year ago
      1. I know what you mean. There's a particular group of rarity hunters that seem to have no regard for the ecosystem and frankly have zero interest in the subject's wellbeing, had it not been rare. In their hunting for stats, they sometimes go too far.

        And on a similar note, a particular type of photographer would totally appoint the favorable light as their well planned artistic choice.

        Yet you do not. I deeply respect that.
        Posted one year ago
        1. Ferdy

          I wish it had been!

          But no, you only fool yourself that way.

          Accept the good luck and try to remember the lesson.

          What was I talking about................? :-)
          Posted one year ago
          1. Your next video, I think :) Posted one year ago

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''Subcoccinella vigintiquatuorpunctata'' is a beetle in the family Coccinellidae. It is the only member of the genus ''Subcoccinella''. It has the typical, almost semi-spherical, ladybird shape and is patterned with spots. However it differs from many of the well-known ladybirds in being neither smooth and shiny nor an eater of aphids: the wing-cases look velvety and it eats fungal moulds on plants.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Philip Booker
View Philip Booker's profile

By Philip Booker

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Uploaded Jan 14, 2021. Captured in Unnamed Road, Stanmer, Brighton BN1 9QD, UK.