🦋 Celebrate Moth Week 2021 July 17-25 🦋

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Botany Bay diamond weevil Native to this country in the south-east, taking the title of &#039;first insect from Australia&#039;, after being collected by Sir Joseph Banks when Captain Cook&rsquo;s expedition landed in Botany Bay in 1770, then recorded officially in 1775 by Danish entomologist Johan Fabricius. <br />
<br />
It is a lovely looking insect whose colour is predominantly black with patches of metallic blue or green scales. Both immature and adult stages live on just 28 of our 1000 Acacia species. The larvae form tunnels in the trunk and roots of the plant. <br />
<br />
N.B. not captive, seen making its way across pot plant gravel. <br />
<br />
25 mm body length, perhaps female as they are the larger size. <br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/104960/botany_bay_diamond_weevil_dorsal.html" title="Botany Bay diamond weevil dorsal"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3314/104960_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1629331210&Signature=LlmYDy8r3dY90X6z%2BaOjglttKNA%3D" width="200" height="164" alt="Botany Bay diamond weevil dorsal Native to this country in the south-east, taking the title of &#039;first insect from Australia&#039;, after being collected by Sir Joseph Banks when Captain Cook&rsquo;s expedition landed in Botany Bay in 1770, then recorded officially in 1775 by Danish entomologist Johan Fabricius.<br />
<br />
It is a lovely looking insect whose colour is predominantly black with patches of metallic blue or green scales. Both immature and adult stages live on just 28 of our 1000 Acacia species. The larvae form tunnels in the trunk and roots of the plant.<br />
<br />
N.B. not captive, seen making its way across pot plant gravel.<br />
<br />
25 mm body length, perhaps female as they are the larger size.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/104884/botany_bay_diamond_weevil.html Australia,Botany Bay diamond weevil,Botany Bay weevil,Chrysolopus spectabilis,Coleoptera,Curculionidae,Fauna,Geotagged,Insect,Macro,Sapphire weevil,Spring,arthropod,invertebate,new south wales,weevil" /></a></figure> Australia,Botany Bay diamond weevil,Botany Bay weevil,Chrysolopus spectabilis,Coleoptera,Curculionidae,Fauna,Geotagged,Macro,Sapphire weevil,Spring,arthropod,insect,invertebrate,new south wales,weevil Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Botany Bay diamond weevil

Native to this country in the south-east, taking the title of 'first insect from Australia', after being collected by Sir Joseph Banks when Captain Cook’s expedition landed in Botany Bay in 1770, then recorded officially in 1775 by Danish entomologist Johan Fabricius.

It is a lovely looking insect whose colour is predominantly black with patches of metallic blue or green scales. Both immature and adult stages live on just 28 of our 1000 Acacia species. The larvae form tunnels in the trunk and roots of the plant.

N.B. not captive, seen making its way across pot plant gravel.

25 mm body length, perhaps female as they are the larger size.

Botany Bay diamond weevil dorsal Native to this country in the south-east, taking the title of 'first insect from Australia', after being collected by Sir Joseph Banks when Captain Cook’s expedition landed in Botany Bay in 1770, then recorded officially in 1775 by Danish entomologist Johan Fabricius.<br />
<br />
It is a lovely looking insect whose colour is predominantly black with patches of metallic blue or green scales. Both immature and adult stages live on just 28 of our 1000 Acacia species. The larvae form tunnels in the trunk and roots of the plant.<br />
<br />
N.B. not captive, seen making its way across pot plant gravel.<br />
<br />
25 mm body length, perhaps female as they are the larger size.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/104884/botany_bay_diamond_weevil.html Australia,Botany Bay diamond weevil,Botany Bay weevil,Chrysolopus spectabilis,Coleoptera,Curculionidae,Fauna,Geotagged,Insect,Macro,Sapphire weevil,Spring,arthropod,invertebate,new south wales,weevil

    comments (7)

  1. Absolute perfection!!! Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thanks Lisa. I spent a good while with this one after photographing. Fascinating insect and of course, so pleasing to the eye. I think a lot about what the Brits thought of the flora and fauna when they got down here, it must have been like going to the moon for them. I'm British, have been here 22 years and I'm still agog. Posted 7 months ago
  2. Agree with Lisa, superb! Posted 7 months ago
    1. So glad you enjoyed, thank you Ferdy. Posted 7 months ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    The Botany Bay diamond weevil (Chrysolopus spectabilis) has a claim to fame! It was the very first insect to be described from Australia! During the first voyage of James Cook, when the ship Endeavour arrived at Botany Bay in 1770, the Botany Bay diamond weevil was collected and described by naturalist Sir Joseph Banks.

    It is native to the southeastern part of Australia where it feeds on Acacia. It is somewhat particular--out of 1,000 species of Acacia, the weevil only feeds on 28. {Spotted in NSW, Australia by Ruth Spigelman} #JungleDragon #Botanybaydiamondweevil #Chrysolopusspectabilis #australia

    Ruth's photos are a wonderful display of the magnificence found in nature. They are artistic and awe-inspiring. Gasp-worthy, really. Check out more of her photos: https://www.jungledragon.com/user/3314/popular

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife
    Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thank you for highlighting this brilliant little insect and most a kind write up of my images! (I'm currently reading Grantlee Kieza's 'Banks' biography and thoroughly recommend). Posted 7 months ago
      1. You're welcome! And, thanks for the recommendation! I will add it to my reading list! Posted 7 months ago

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''Chrysolopus spectabilis'' is a species of weevil found in south-eastern Australia. It is up to 25 mm long, with metallic green patterns on a black background. It is a specialist, only known from 28 species of ''Acacia''.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 27, 2020. Captured Nov 27, 2020 12:35 in 25A Charlotte St, Merewether NSW 2291, Australia.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/14.0
  • 10/2000s
  • ISO250
  • 105mm