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Purple Willow leafs UV, Heesch, Netherlands A while ago, I made a nightly stroll through our small garden to pre-select UV subjects. I used a 320nm light, sometimes called &quot;pure UV&quot;. This in contrast to popular UV flashlights that above all are powerful yet not pure in their wavelength. <br />
<br />
Given a suitable light, we expose the subject to it exclusively, no other light should interfere. If its a UV &quot;sensitive&quot; subject it will &quot;reflect&quot; back color in the visible spectrum. Succesful subjects in the same garden:<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93389/common_orange_lichen_-_uv_macro_2.51_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Common Orange Lichen - UV macro 2.5:1, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/93389_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1609372810&Signature=gnl4CvY3ZIt73QFBJQAUggyV2TE%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Common Orange Lichen - UV macro 2.5:1, Heesch, Netherlands Credit for using lichens as UV subjects goes to the makers of the Adaptalux lighting system, this is one of their tutorials. The difference is in magnification, they&#039;re using a non-macro approach whilst I tried my luck at 1:1, 2.5:1 and 5:1. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93387/common_orange_lichen_-_uv_macro_11_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93388/common_orange_lichen_-_uv_macro_51_heesch_netherlands.html Common orange lichen,Extreme Macro,Ultra Violet Light,WeMacro,Xanthoria parietina" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93386/mexican_orange_-_uv_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Mexican Orange - UV, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/93386_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1609372810&Signature=OlEMio4x87kC1YuIr%2FUJ9x5%2F%2B90%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Mexican Orange - UV, Heesch, Netherlands Here&#039;s the Mexican Orange, in totally not orange, instead in UV. <br />
<br />
I&#039;ll use this post to share some of my still quite limited understanding of UV. UV light, or UV radiation is light in the wavelength 1-400nm. The entirety of this big range is not visible to the human eye. Some of it does reach the human eye from the sun, yet our &quot;lens&quot; blocks it. Some animals can see parts of the UV range, such as bees.<br />
<br />
The huge range from 1-400nm is divided into 3 categories, the only interesting category for photography and other consumer use is &quot;near UV&quot;: 380&ndash;200 nm. Shorter wave lengths mainly have industrial and medical use and are highly dangerous to human skin and eyes. <br />
<br />
Near UV in turn is further divided into sub categories, of which only &quot;Long wave UV&quot; is relevant for photography. Some lab people may play around with shorter wavelengths at home (in particular to photograph minerals), yet this too is highly dangerous.<br />
<br />
Longwave is 320 to 400 nm, also called UV-A. This is our relevant photography range. It can be used for two distinct types of UV photography: Reflected UV photography or UV induced fluorescence photography.<br />
<br />
Reflected UV photography (strongly) illuminates the subject with UV light, yet the subject may also be exposed to other wavelengths. So this can be done in daylight. Next, a filter is placed on the lens to block any light except UV light. <br />
<br />
UV induced fluorescence photography exposes the subject to UV light and UV light only. In other words, it requires full darkness. In this darkness, you cannot see the actual illumination, as UV light itself is invisible. However, when doing this on a UV sensitive subject, the subject will absorb the UV light and emit excess energy (UV light contains more energy compared to longer wave lengths) in the form of light in the visible spectrum.<br />
<br />
To put all this together, the above scene does not show UV light itself, it shows a subject absorbing it and emitting some of it back into the visible spectrum, in this case purple and yellow. Choisya ternata,Extreme Macro,Ultra Violet Light" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
This particular subject caught my eye during the UV round. This cultivated Salix purpurea lit up like a faint christmas tree. In particular, it seems the jagged edges of each leaf (and there&#039;s hundreds on this tree) create little light sparks whilst every other part of this plant/tree does nothing, and remains dark. I&#039;m not convinced it has any biological function, but it does look cool.<br />
<br />
Transfering this effect to a photo is difficult, and I find the result underwhelming compared to the real experience. So you kind of have to image this photo times 500 for what it looks like in the real world.<br />
<br />
Making of: I took a few leafs and taped them to end of a lens hood, effectively creating a small dark chamber. Next, I aimed the UV light inside and exposed for 2 minutes using my 1:1 macro lens. <br />
 Europe,Heesch,Netherlands,Salix purpurea,Ultra Violet Light,World Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Purple Willow leafs UV, Heesch, Netherlands

A while ago, I made a nightly stroll through our small garden to pre-select UV subjects. I used a 320nm light, sometimes called "pure UV". This in contrast to popular UV flashlights that above all are powerful yet not pure in their wavelength.

Given a suitable light, we expose the subject to it exclusively, no other light should interfere. If its a UV "sensitive" subject it will "reflect" back color in the visible spectrum. Succesful subjects in the same garden:

Common Orange Lichen - UV macro 2.5:1, Heesch, Netherlands Credit for using lichens as UV subjects goes to the makers of the Adaptalux lighting system, this is one of their tutorials. The difference is in magnification, they're using a non-macro approach whilst I tried my luck at 1:1, 2.5:1 and 5:1. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93387/common_orange_lichen_-_uv_macro_11_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93388/common_orange_lichen_-_uv_macro_51_heesch_netherlands.html Common orange lichen,Extreme Macro,Ultra Violet Light,WeMacro,Xanthoria parietina

Mexican Orange - UV, Heesch, Netherlands Here's the Mexican Orange, in totally not orange, instead in UV. <br />
<br />
I'll use this post to share some of my still quite limited understanding of UV. UV light, or UV radiation is light in the wavelength 1-400nm. The entirety of this big range is not visible to the human eye. Some of it does reach the human eye from the sun, yet our "lens" blocks it. Some animals can see parts of the UV range, such as bees.<br />
<br />
The huge range from 1-400nm is divided into 3 categories, the only interesting category for photography and other consumer use is "near UV": 380–200 nm. Shorter wave lengths mainly have industrial and medical use and are highly dangerous to human skin and eyes. <br />
<br />
Near UV in turn is further divided into sub categories, of which only "Long wave UV" is relevant for photography. Some lab people may play around with shorter wavelengths at home (in particular to photograph minerals), yet this too is highly dangerous.<br />
<br />
Longwave is 320 to 400 nm, also called UV-A. This is our relevant photography range. It can be used for two distinct types of UV photography: Reflected UV photography or UV induced fluorescence photography.<br />
<br />
Reflected UV photography (strongly) illuminates the subject with UV light, yet the subject may also be exposed to other wavelengths. So this can be done in daylight. Next, a filter is placed on the lens to block any light except UV light. <br />
<br />
UV induced fluorescence photography exposes the subject to UV light and UV light only. In other words, it requires full darkness. In this darkness, you cannot see the actual illumination, as UV light itself is invisible. However, when doing this on a UV sensitive subject, the subject will absorb the UV light and emit excess energy (UV light contains more energy compared to longer wave lengths) in the form of light in the visible spectrum.<br />
<br />
To put all this together, the above scene does not show UV light itself, it shows a subject absorbing it and emitting some of it back into the visible spectrum, in this case purple and yellow. Choisya ternata,Extreme Macro,Ultra Violet Light


This particular subject caught my eye during the UV round. This cultivated Salix purpurea lit up like a faint christmas tree. In particular, it seems the jagged edges of each leaf (and there's hundreds on this tree) create little light sparks whilst every other part of this plant/tree does nothing, and remains dark. I'm not convinced it has any biological function, but it does look cool.

Transfering this effect to a photo is difficult, and I find the result underwhelming compared to the real experience. So you kind of have to image this photo times 500 for what it looks like in the real world.

Making of: I took a few leafs and taped them to end of a lens hood, effectively creating a small dark chamber. Next, I aimed the UV light inside and exposed for 2 minutes using my 1:1 macro lens.

    comments (4)

  1. So pretty! Posted 9 days ago
    1. Thanks! Posted 8 days ago
  2. Gorgeous colors! Posted 9 days ago
    1. Thanks, Deb! Posted 8 days ago

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''Salix purpurea'' is a species of willow native to most of Europe and western Asia north to the British Isles, Poland, and the Baltic States.

Similar species: Malpighiales
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 16, 2020. Captured Oct 17, 2020 21:45.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/8.0
  • 118s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm