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Pied currawong Once a regular winter visitor to our lowland areas, pied currawongs are increasingly remaining at lower elevation areas throughout the whole year. Assisted by extra food in the form of scraps and the berries of exotic plants, they have become permanent guests in the lowlands. But the converse is also true - pied currawongs are also now a year-round sight at many of our alpine ski resorts. In the winter, when they should be elsewhere, currawongs can be seen hopping about in the snow, scavenging scraps. <br />
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These are beautifully vocal birds, calling when in flight and at all times of the day. I hear them mostly early in the morning and in the evening before roosting, as well as interestingly before rain. The loud distinctive call has been translated as &#039;kadow-kadang&#039; or &#039;curra-wong&#039;. They also have a loud, high-pitched, wolf-like whistle, transcribed as &#039;wheeo&#039;. <br />
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The pied currawong is an omnivorous and opportunistic feeder, eating fruit and berries as well as preying on many invertebrates, smaller vertebrates, mostly juvenile birds and bird eggs.<br />
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50 cm length<br />
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<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/otZGQTk0Toc?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section> Artamidae,Australia,Aves,Geotagged,Passeriformes,Pied Currawong,Spring,Strepera graculina,bird,fauna,new south wales Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Pied currawong

Once a regular winter visitor to our lowland areas, pied currawongs are increasingly remaining at lower elevation areas throughout the whole year. Assisted by extra food in the form of scraps and the berries of exotic plants, they have become permanent guests in the lowlands. But the converse is also true - pied currawongs are also now a year-round sight at many of our alpine ski resorts. In the winter, when they should be elsewhere, currawongs can be seen hopping about in the snow, scavenging scraps.

These are beautifully vocal birds, calling when in flight and at all times of the day. I hear them mostly early in the morning and in the evening before roosting, as well as interestingly before rain. The loud distinctive call has been translated as 'kadow-kadang' or 'curra-wong'. They also have a loud, high-pitched, wolf-like whistle, transcribed as 'wheeo'.

The pied currawong is an omnivorous and opportunistic feeder, eating fruit and berries as well as preying on many invertebrates, smaller vertebrates, mostly juvenile birds and bird eggs.

50 cm length

    comments (7)

  1. They look like a cartoon villain :) Posted one month ago
    1. Funny you said that -- I was thinking it looks like Gargamel (from the Smurfs cartoon...way back in the 80's). Posted one month ago
      1. Didn't know that show made it to the US. Posted one month ago
        1. I had no idea it began elsewhere. Posted one month ago
    2. Perfect description Ferdy! They do have a 'bad boy' look on that face. Posted one month ago, modified one month ago
  2. I love corvids! So intelligent! Posted one month ago
    1. Not within Corvidae, but Artamidae. More closely related to butcherbirds. One can see the resemblance to a corvid, indeed that's why early European visitors to Australia named our famous magpie such, reminded them of those back home in the UK, which are also corvids. But our magpies are in family Artamidae as well as these pied currawongs. This is why common name can be so confusing! Posted one month ago

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The Pied Currawong is a medium-sized black passerine bird native to eastern Australia and Lord Howe Island. One of three currawong species in the genus ''Strepera'', it is closely related to the butcherbirds and Australian Magpie of the family Artamidae. Known for its melodious calls, the species' name ''currawong'' is believed to be of indigenous origin.

Similar species: Passerines
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
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By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 23, 2020. Captured Oct 12, 2020 10:44 in Myamblah Crescent Reserve, Myamblah Cres, Merewether NSW 2291, Australia.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/10.0
  • 10/3200s
  • ISO250
  • 250mm