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Toxotoma pulchra Not the greatest photo in the world, but this one is very special to me.<br />
<br />
Deep in the rain forest of Peru on the way to Machu Pichu in 2019, I somehow caught sight of this Blue Ladybird (Ladybug) several feet away in the undergrowth.<br />
<br />
I wasn&#039;t aware Blue Ladybirds even existed.<br />
<br />
Nor it appears, did a couple of knowledgeable Etymologists I spoke to in my efforts to identify it when I returned to the UK.<br />
<br />
On my hands and knees, desperate not to disturb it, I watched as it climbed a blade of grass, took a drink from the dew drop, and climbed down again to go merrily on its way.<br />
<br />
I eventually posted the photos on iNaturalist, but had pretty much forgotten about it when I was contacted by a South American Etymologist, who with others, maintains an ongoing scientific record &quot;Coccinellidae de Per&uacute;&quot;.<br />
<br />
He was able to identify my friend as Toxotoma pulchra (Weise, 1899). It is highly localised to the area in which I had found it, and rare enough for them not to have any photographs of live specimens.<br />
<br />
They do now. I gladly gave them permission to use mine.<br />
<br />
The page in question can be viewed here: <a href="http://www.coccinellidae.cl/paginasWebPeru/Paginas/Toxotoma_pulchra_Peru.php" rel="nofollow">http://www.coccinellidae.cl/paginasWebPeru/Paginas/Toxotoma_pulchra_Peru.php</a><br />
 Geotagged,Peru,Spring,Toxotoma pulchra Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Toxotoma pulchra

Not the greatest photo in the world, but this one is very special to me.

Deep in the rain forest of Peru on the way to Machu Pichu in 2019, I somehow caught sight of this Blue Ladybird (Ladybug) several feet away in the undergrowth.

I wasn't aware Blue Ladybirds even existed.

Nor it appears, did a couple of knowledgeable Etymologists I spoke to in my efforts to identify it when I returned to the UK.

On my hands and knees, desperate not to disturb it, I watched as it climbed a blade of grass, took a drink from the dew drop, and climbed down again to go merrily on its way.

I eventually posted the photos on iNaturalist, but had pretty much forgotten about it when I was contacted by a South American Etymologist, who with others, maintains an ongoing scientific record "Coccinellidae de Perú".

He was able to identify my friend as Toxotoma pulchra (Weise, 1899). It is highly localised to the area in which I had found it, and rare enough for them not to have any photographs of live specimens.

They do now. I gladly gave them permission to use mine.

The page in question can be viewed here: http://www.coccinellidae.cl/paginasWebPeru/Paginas/Toxotoma_pulchra_Peru.php

    comments (13)

  1. Awesome find, wow! I had no idea there were blue ladybugs either. Posted one month ago
    1. Christine

      See my reply to Ruth below.

      If one wants to add a photo on this site, does it have to be a separate, full upload, or can one add to an existing record?
      Posted one month ago
      1. So interesting, and I'm glad you found this beauty! Like you said, who knows how many more interesting beetles are out there!

        To answer your question, you do have to upload each photo separately. Then, you can add the links in the description for each spotting/photo to link them, if you wish.
        Posted one month ago
        1. Understood.

          Thank you.
          Posted one month ago
  2. Philip, I'm very glad you had this encounter/experience. It's always a thrill to come across a species for the first time, especially something as pretty as this. And most beneficial to records if rare, as you state. Here in Australia, we have blue ladybirds as well, but not at all rare and with a more metallic elytra. They are always a delight to see. Posted one month ago, modified one month ago
    1. Hi Ruth

      Yes. During my investigations I found out about Steelblue Ladybirds (Halmus chalybeus) in Australia and New Zealand, where it was introduced from the former as a pest control. I can't remember what for?

      As you say, they are distinctly metallic with the blue almost green in many examples.

      One 'expert' claimed on her website, the only blue ladybirds outside of Australia of which she'd ever seen evidence, turned out to be doctored photographs, and she didn't think there were any true blue one's. I was happy to set the record right.

      Many beetles are still to be discovered, if we don't destroy them first, so there may be others?
      Posted one month ago
  3. Awesome! really wonderful! Posted one month ago
  4. Thank you, Yael. Posted one month ago
  5. A beautiful piece of pioneering work, Philips, well done! Posted one month ago
    1. Largely luck, but very satisfying nevertheless.

      I shall never forget it.

      Oh, and there were some old ruins at the top of the mountain there which were quite interesting, as well as a few more interesting wildlife encounters, which I'll post in due course.

      It just makes you wonder what one doesn't spot!?
      Posted one month ago
      1. Looking forward to more!

        And yes, I wonder that all the time when in the tropics: there's probably a million creatures within my immediate sight right now, and I'll probably find 3 lol.
        Posted one month ago
  6. Wow...Awesome! Posted 28 days ago
    1. I can't deny it! Posted 27 days ago

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Toxotoma pulchra is a beetle in the family Coccinellidae.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Christine Young
View Philip Booker's profile

By Philip Booker

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 26, 2020. Captured Oct 22, 2019 13:38 in Unnamed Road, 08680, Peru.
  • DSC-RX10M4
  • f/4.0
  • 1/250s
  • ISO1000
  • 220mm