Claude CHAVAND

Claude CHAVAND

Love insects, especially weevils
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    1. Most of European insects have been discovered and baptized in the 19th century.
      Since then, to me, there is no reason anymore for killing insects just to satisfy personal curiosity (except may be for scientists).
      I cannot see where is the benefit/interest to collect insects like pins, beer capsules or stamps.
    2. Merci, I've found it behind a bark, put it on jam jar lid for photo session and released it !
    3. Comment on Morimus asper (Sulzer, 1776) 16 days ago
      Female because of its relatively short antennas
    4. Comment on Black Trumpets (Craterellus fallax) 18 days ago
      Lucky you, this year in my place no mushroom at all, it's so dry !
    5. Comment on Black Trumpets (Craterellus fallax) 18 days ago
      The European version is succulent, what about this one ?
    6. Bonjour,
      Pleave have a look on the legs, they are clearly bicolor.
      So to me this species is more likely Stictoleptura rubra rather than Stictoleptura fulva ...
    7. Comment on Otiorhynchus fagi Gyllenhal, 1834 one month ago
    8. Comment on Jordanita sp. one month ago
      Yes this family is a nightmare for ID.
      The difference between Adscita and Jordanita (for females) lies on the shape of antennas :
      - constant thickness with pointed tips --> Jordanita
      - antennas widening significantly before ending by pointed tips --> Adscita

      For males, the difference is even smaller...
    9. Comment on Cryptophilus angustus one month ago
      Bonjour,
      I agree with you for the family, it is Cryptophagidae.
      For the genus it is another business, I've checked the possibilities among those found in North America.
      To me, it could be Antherophagus (4 possible species, see https://biologicalsurvey.ca/ejournal/ph_40/taxonomy.html) but this is highly uncertain...
    10. Comment on The study of borders one month ago
      Well, for sure it is not Hylotrupes bajulus that belongs to Cerambycinae familly.
      I agree with Ferdy, this insect is probably a dark form of female Stictoleptura rubra which is usually more redish (bicolor legs, Lepturinae general shape).
      This species is very active at this season; few days ago, I saw plenty of females roaming around decaying fir stumps looking for a place to deposid their eggs.