Pudding4brains

Pudding4brains

Time restraints due to changed circumstances in life make it impossible to put much time in, so I will be refraining from "socializing" for some time to come (nothing personal!) and restrict myself to just "dumping" (uploading) images to make these available as CC0 / Public Domain for anyone to use. Used to be: Hobby entomologist interested in many "unpopular" groups (Opiliones, Oniscidea, Microcoryphia, Zygentoma, Dermaptera, Blattodea, Neuroptera, Mecoptera, Raphidioptera etc.
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    1. Comment on Mycetina cruciata (Schaller,1783) 26 days ago
      Nice find, Claude! Cheers, Arp
      (I've added the species to JD, so you can identify your image now)
    2. Comment on Platymischus dilatatus - Male 27 days ago
      September 2013 it was - one of my previous cameras still; A Canon Powershot compact camera (S100? or so) that I never became friends with. My previous 4Mpx Fuji u480 made better images.

      P.S. I was in the field with Jan van Duinen that day and he produced much better images:
      https://old.waarneming.nl/waarneming/view/79131060
    3. Comment on Pnigalio epilobii - Grooming 27 days ago
      Thanks Paul (see remarks above) :o)
    4. Comment on Pnigalio epilobii - Grooming 27 days ago
      Thanks Ferdy :o) Yes, I just checked the fingerprint on my thumb vs the picture of the male - that one must have been well under 2mm (1.8-1.9ish), the lady may have been like 2.1 or so maybe ...
      These images are from 2016, so 4 years ago now - I was surprised at the quality myself, so obviously I haven't improved much on that over the past 4 years (same equipment too, so go figure ..)
    5. Comment on Cirrospilus pictus 27 days ago
      Very handsome little wasp :o)
    6. Comment on Cirrospilus pictus 27 days ago
      In short (I'm sure a better definition is possible): A hyperparasite is an organism that is a parasite on a parasite of the original host.
      Usually both are parasitoids (parasites that in the end cause the death of their host).
      Example: A Braconid wasp lays it eggs on/in a caterpillar. The larvae of the Braconid wasp eat the caterpillar from the inside, at first while the caterpillar is still alive and keeps feeding, until the caterpillar dies and all soft tissue is consumed (usually the skin remains). Now the mature larvae of the Braconid wasp leave the caterpillar and produce cocoons outside of the caterpillar to pupate and form new wasps. Such cocoons can be seen in one of the images.
      In the mean time a different parasite/parasitoid has injected its eggs into one of the larvae or pupae of the Braconid wasps that originally parasited the caterpillar. So now in turn, the larvae of the parasitic Braconid wasp are eaten to serve as food for the new parasite, which is hence called a "hyperparasite" (a parasite on the parasite of the caterpillar). The wasp depicted above can either be a regular parasitoid, directly attacking the larvae of Moth, Beetles, Flies etc. (usually leafminers, hence very small larvae), or optionally a hyperparasitoid on the larvae of a Braconid wasp that has attacked a larger larva.
    7. Comment on Me? Bad hair day? 27 days ago
      Oh wow - I _do_ have a lookalike somewhere after all! Gotta love it ... :o)
    8. Comment on Stellers Jay and a Northern Flicker 27 days ago
      Fantastic scene - beautiful birds and well captured! :o)
    9. Promoted as an incentive to keep trying and expanding your macro abilities and experience - never stop learning and we will all enjoy the results in the long run :o)
      And actually, I _do_ like the dreamy quality of it!
      The shot by Jeroen Hoppenbrouwers is a stunner and trying to achieve that makes one realize so all the more.
      But I always keep this in mind: One day, when still a student, long, long ago ( ;o) ) we decided to start baking our own bread (yeast based). Our bread came out in a really "heavy" quality (like suitable to attack burglars with it) but we did like the taste of it, escpecially when fresh from the oven. Over time we fine tuned our process and after a year or so of baking every week we finally achieved the fluffy, air-filled, sponge-like structures that supermarkets were selling under the name of "bread" at the time (nowadays much better bread is available). Not at all what we wanted and longing back to the days we had mediocre "technique" :o)
    10. Hi Paul - one of my main interests is Woodlice. You don't want to know how many logs and stones I've turned ... *rolleyes* ;o)