Pudding4brains

Pudding4brains

Hobby entomologist interested in many "unpopular" groups (Opiliones, Oniscidea, Microcoryphia, Zygentoma, Dermaptera, Blattodea, Neuroptera, Mecoptera, Raphidioptera etc.)
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    1. Thanks Melan :o) You may also like this list then:
    2. Comment on Dindymus sp. 4 days ago
      Hi Melan, like I said, there are probably two or more reasonably close options, so I will need to try and find out more about these before I can give a name (if at all). Will try to do so next week (having a week off).
      Cheers, Arp
    3. Comment on Dindymus sp. 6 days ago
      Hi Melan, I love the effort you've put into the description, so I hate to be a party pooper but this is not a Reduviidae, but rather some Pyrrhocoridae, probably in the genus Dindymus, that is also known for species with predatory behaviour.
      This might well be Dindymus albicornis, that is known from Malaysia, but I also see some images of a "Dindymus pulcher" on the internet that look very similar, but as always we have to be careful about misidentifications being propagated by people looking at misnamed images of other people. At least it should warrant some closer look at the origin of both names an possibly original descriptions and/or trying to find a key. I don't have the time for this right now, but this is the direction you should be looking in.
      Cheers, Arp
    4. Comment on Arma custos L4 portrait 15 days ago
      Thanks Ferdy, not so happy with the dorsal one but it is a vast improvement over the older L4 shot anyway ;o)
    5. Comment on Arma custos 4th stadium nymph 16 days ago
      Hi Ruth and thanks for the flowers :o) The terms "instar" and "stadium" are exchangeable I think. Our national True Bug champion (Berend Aukema) doesn't seem to like the term "instar" much, so I've taken to using stadium a tad more, but overall people indicate the same thing with it. In most true bugs (I'm sure there are some exceptions), after hatching from the eggs into a 1st stadium/instar nymph (some would call it a larva, but that's a different language-issue) the little ones need to moult five more times before they are full grown, so the fourth stadium you see here is the one before the last nymphal stadium and two moults away from adulthood (imago) with fully developed wings. If you'll look at a 5th stadium/instar nymph/larva of the same species you'll see that the wing-capsules are clearly longer on that last stadium:
      Arma custos - L5 nearly done Last instar nymph of Shield Bug species Arma custos, only hours before shedding into adulthood.<br />
Ventral view of the same nymph here (note the strong rostrum of this predatory species): https://www.jungledragon.com/image/53213/arma_custos_l5_ventral.html<br />
Resulting imago, only a few hours later: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/53214/arma_custos_somewhat_teneral.html Arma,Arma custos,Asopinae,Hemiptera,Heteroptera,Nymph,Pentatomidae
    6. Comment on Aelia acuminata ID 26 days ago
      Whoops ... ;o) ... done [v]
    7. Comment on Megalotomus quinquespinosus one month ago
      Yes, Alydidae for sure and I think Christine is probably spot-on with Megalotomus quinquespinosus - there seems to be no body double for this one :o)
    8. Comment on Ligia oceanica - 3mm juvenile one month ago
      Yes, there have been some other studies on this as well. I should probably extend our species profile a little to include some of that at some point *rolleyes* ... ;o)
    9. Howdy, what do you need? Many of my images are mediocre at best (those darn roaches just won't sit still for a second!) and I do not have much for Capriellus myself, but I can probably help "organize" the images that you need. All my images are Public Domain so no restrictions on usage whatsoever, but some of the images I can arrange for you might have "non commercial" licenses or some such, so it would be good to know
      - Which species exactly and/or if you need male, female, nymphal stages, ooth, whatever ...
      - What the type of usage would be (educational/commercial or not or if you need to create derivative works)
      We can discuss this over email if you want, just send me a private message with your mail address.
      Cheers, Arp
      The images I have on JD, you will find in this list (together with some non-roach Orthopteroids):
    10. Comment on Oxyethira flavicornis one month ago
      ID confirmed. The long antennae on the specimen below seem to be a bit of a problem - possibly an aberration(!)
      Oxyethira flavicornis - Long antennae The long antennae on this one presumably would be aberrant. The normal length is like the specimen in the image below:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/82704/oxyethira_flavicornis_.html<br />
For (Dutch) discussion see:<br />
https://forum.waarneming.nl/smf/index.php?topic=456129.0 Alerdinck,Hydroptilidae,Hydroptiloidea,Oxyethira,Oxyethira flavicornis,Spicipalpia,Trichoptera