morpheme

morpheme

I'm a professional medical photographer, hiker, cyclist and nature lover
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    1. It is interesting... the Wiki entry for the genus mentions that there's just 4 recognized species and names them, but I can only find any info on one, which definitely isn't the one I photographed - different host and white galls. Of course there may be far more than 4... it seems like studying gall mites and identifying them isn't a big priority unless they cause a problem for an agricultural product or an nursery ornamental..
    2. Comment on Spring fruiting white mushrooms 3 days ago
      It's a Pacific Northwest specific database called MatchMaker. It's more extensive than anything I've seen elsewhere - it has 4,200 mushrooms specific to this area of the world in it!
      It looks like they've discontinued the version that will work on my laptop (I'm a Mac person), but made a new version for iPhone.. so I'm still in luck, mostly - they mention they've left out anything in the database with no photo. I guess, I just have to put it on my phone now....
      I've found the second drawback - the phone app is huge, and it only includes gilled mushrooms with photos... which only comprise about 1/4th of the database. Hmmm - I'll have to see if I can find a workaround to run the PC version of the desktop program.
    3. Comment on 16241369527661047464909433229686 4 days ago
      I'd agree with that - but it appears they may have a new name... Crucibulum crucibuliforme, this must be fairly recent.
    4. The two on inaturalist are even in just about the same area - Leavenworth is probably only 20-30 miles as the crow flies from where I was and the other is in Washington too.
    5. Comment on Looking out over the Stewart Range 4 days ago
      The Stewart range? Some people climb it. It's not extremely tall, but it is an honest to goodness mountain with year round snow fields. It's not quite like climbing a huge summit, but you do need basic mountaineering skills - how to use an ice axe, self arrest, how to use crampons. It's not uncommon for one or two people to die there in any given year.... either they fall and cannot self arrest or they fall through ice bridges into running water under the snow.

      There's a pass called Aasgard (really) that hikers use to get into the interior of the area that tops out at 7800 feet. It's the shorter of the routes to get in, but it's considered to be the hard way to go..

      https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/mount-stuart
      https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/dragontail-peak
      https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/aasgard-pass
    6. I'm vaccinated (and the husband too) and finally back on the trails :) - we were the first place in the US to have a confirmed COVID case up here, so our restrictions have been long and strict... and I work in a hospital (and continued to work mostly throughout) so I was even more strict with myself, as a potential vector, about really staying away from other people until it was undeniably clear that the vaccine was preventing not only illness but also spread. I wasn't making any unnecessary trips outside of my own neighborhood.... But things are much better out here now - I think we're up to 76% in King county with at least their first vaccine and we know that vaccinated people are low risk to spread COVID, so happy trails again!
    7. Hi Miri - We can't name your insect just yet - ID's only happen at the species level. It's OK to leave photos without an ID though. There are some very good insect experts around here, so if you give people a little more information - especially where it was found (geo-tag on the map), they may be able to help you get to an answer, if it's possible.
    8. Comment on Monster 5 days ago
      Whoa - that is the tank version of the harvestman.... ours all look like a dot suspended on thread.
    9. Holy cow... is there an agency you can report that to? We're very sensitive to them out here, as we do not actually yet have a problem with any kind of large scale infestations. There is careful monitoring and occasional spraying with a biologic (non-chemical, bacterial I believe) control agent if they are even suspected.
    10. Comment on Club Coral 5 months ago
      While we have both here, C. truncatus much more common.
      Really I'd stick with that too - look at these images to see what they look like in groups that have some newly emerged and some more mature individuals and you'll see why I think that.
      https://www.pharmanatur.com/Mycologie/Clavariadelphus%20truncatus.htm