Jivko Nakev

Jivko Nakev

Amateur Wildlife Photographer, Collector, Economist, Enthusiast, Optimist, Curious Nature Observer
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    1. Comment on Philodromus aureolus 2 hrs ago
      Thanks, Marta!
    2. This fantastic world is so attractive! Pity, I can't dive!
      But the world on the surface is not less fantastic! However, we observe it daily and are accustomed to it, but for most of us, the underwater world is completely unknown.
    3. Albert, I wonder, aren't you tempted to touch all these wonderful creatures, to caress them? They look so calm and safe! At least at first glance! :-)
    4. Thank you, Christine!
    5. Comment on Trichius fasciatus 17 hrs ago
      Hi Paul, I think this is not T.fasciatus but T.gallicus.
      The first black band on the elytra of T.fasciatus reaches the scutellum or even spread across the wing-case, while at T.gallicus the black blotches on the wing-case are similar sizes to other blotches.
      BTW, here from all the 5 photos, only one is of T.fasciatus:
      Trichius fasciatus - Bee-beetle, Finland Bee-beetle (Trichius fasciatus) is present in most of Europe and in the East Palearctic ecozone. It is common also in Finland. In this image it's feeding on Wood Cranesbill (Geranium sylvaticum). Bee-beetle,Coleoptera,Finland,Geotagged,Pohjois-Karjala,Scandinavia,Scarabaeidae,Summer,Trichius,Trichius fasciatus,insect

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichius_fasciatus
      I have edited the other 3 entries accordingly.
    6. Comment on Clouded Daisy Fly - Oxyna nebulosa yesterday
      Thank you, Ferdy! I added it to the title and the tags.
    7. Thank you, Marta!
    8. Comment on Entypus fulvicornis 2 days ago
      OMG, at first glance it's really monstrous!
    9. Comment on Ant bag beetle - Clytra laeviuscula 3 days ago
      This is very interesting. Thank you for this information!
    10. Wow, amazing shots, Ferdy! I know very little about their life cycles and your photos inspired me to dive into the realm of mosquitoes. Interestingly, more than 3500 species have been described, but we only have 18 in JD! I had no idea there were so many.