Forest cuckoo bumblebee

Bombus sylvestris

''Bombus sylvestris'', known as the forest cuckoo bumblebee or four-coloured cuckoo bee, is a species of cuckoo bumblebee, found in most of Europe and Russia. Its main hosts are ''Bombus pratorum'', ''Bombus jonellus'', and ''Bombus monticola''.
Black bumble or carpenter bee? This little fella was disturbed  whilst I was gardening.  I’m not sure if I damaged him or not.  There seemed to be a sort of crust on his tail which he was trying to remove.  I wonder if it could be the pupae case or an invasive bug? I’d love to know if it could possibly be a black bumble? Any help appreciated.  Bee,Bombus sylvestris,Essex  UK.,Forest cuckoo bumblebee,Geotagged,United Kingdom,black,summer

Appearance

This is a small bumblebee; the queen has a body length of 15 mm and the male one of 14 mm. The head is round, and the proboscis is short. Its fur is black with a yellow collar and a white tail. Sometimes the bumblebee can have a few pale hairs on top of its head, its scutellum, and/or on its tergite . The male is variably melanistic. Those rarely found in northern Scotland have an abdomen that is yellow instead of white.
Forest cuckoo bumblebee - Bombus cf. sylvestris I'm not sure about the identification of the species. Due to the lack of a yellow band on the abdomen, I tend to believe that it is after all Bombus sylvestris. Animal,Animalia,Apidae,Apoidea,Arthropoda,Bombus sylvestris,Bulgaria,Europe,Forest cuckoo bumblebee,Geotagged,Hymenoptera,Insect,Insecta,Pchelina dam,Pernik,Spring,Wildlife

Distribution

The forest cuckoo bumblebee can be found throughout most of Europe from the northern half of the Iberian Peninsula to southern Italy, from Greece in the south to beyond the Arctic Circle in the north, and from Ireland in the west to the easternmost part of Russia. They are found throughout Britain, but are absent in sections of eastern Scotland, the Scilly Isles, and Shetland.

Most ''Bombus sylvestris'' can be found in post-industrial, mineral extraction sites and spoil heaps, gardens, parks, woodlands, and deciduous forests, which is why they get their nickname of the forest cuckoo bumblebee.
A clearer picture of black bee Not sure what caused the damage to this bee.   Bombus sylvestris,Forest cuckoo bumblebee,Geotagged,Summer.  UK,United Kingdom,bee.

Behavior

Since cuckoo bumblebees do not need to supply resources to their young, they do not tend to forage as aggressively or industriously as worker and queen bumblebees. Before entering a nest, cuckoo bumblebees bees tend to behave similar to male bumblebees—drinking nectar until full and then resting until hungry again.
Black bee A face-on view of my bee friend.  Bombus sylvestris,Forest cuckoo bumblebee,Geotagged,Summer,United Kingdom

Habitat

The forest cuckoo bumblebee can be found throughout most of Europe from the northern half of the Iberian Peninsula to southern Italy, from Greece in the south to beyond the Arctic Circle in the north, and from Ireland in the west to the easternmost part of Russia. They are found throughout Britain, but are absent in sections of eastern Scotland, the Scilly Isles, and Shetland.

Most ''Bombus sylvestris'' can be found in post-industrial, mineral extraction sites and spoil heaps, gardens, parks, woodlands, and deciduous forests, which is why they get their nickname of the forest cuckoo bumblebee.
Difficult to see. Back view of damaged bee  Bombus sylvestris,Forest cuckoo bumblebee,Geotagged,Summer,United Kingdom

Food

The Forest cuckoo bee can be found foraging on white deadnettler, globe thistle, white clover, buttercup, sallow, bramble, lavender, and viper's bugloss, along with other specimens.

References:

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Status: Least concern
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionArthropoda
ClassInsecta
OrderHymenoptera
FamilyApidae
GenusBombus
SpeciesB. sylvestris