Sulphur tuft

Hypholoma fasciculare

''Hypholoma fasciculare'', commonly known as the sulphur tuft, sulfur tuft or clustered woodlover, is a common woodland mushroom, often in evidence when hardly any other mushrooms are to be found. This saprophagic small gill fungus grows prolifically in large clumps on stumps, dead roots or rotting trunks of broadleaved trees.
Clusters of Sulphur tuft, Heeswijk-Dinther, Netherlands Top view of multiple clusters in different stages. Europe,Heeswijk-Dinther,Hypholoma fasciculare,Netherlands,Sulphur tuft,World

Appearance

The hemispherical cap can reach 6 cm diameter. It is smooth and sulphur yellow with an orange-brown centre and whitish margin. The crowded gills are initially yellow but darken to a distinctive green colour as the blackish spores develop on the yellow flesh. It has a purple brown spore print. The stipe is up to 10 cm tall and 1 cm wide, light yellow, orange-brown below, often with an indistinct ring zone coloured dark by the spores. The taste is very bitter, though not bitter when cooked, but still poisonous.
Hypholoma fasciculare  Fungi,Hypholoma fasciculare,Macro,Mushrooms,Sulphur tuft,poisonous

Naming

The specific epithet is derived from the Latin ''fascicularis'' 'in bundles' or 'clustered', referring to its habit of growing in clumps. Its name in Japanese is Nigakuritake .
Sulfur tuft - Hypholoma fasciculare  Australia,Geotagged,Hypholoma fasciculare

Distribution

''Hypholoma fasciculare'' grows prolifically on the dead wood of both deciduous and coniferous trees. It is more commonly found on decaying deciduous wood due to the lower lignin content of this wood relative to coniferous wood. ''Hypholoma fasciculare'' is widespread and abundant in northern Europe and North America. It has been recorded from Iran, and also eastern Anatolia in Turkey. It can appear anytime from spring to autumn.
Small yellow wood dwelling mushrooms ☠ I've ID'd these kind before... going to have to search my old posts. If I'm recalling right, the small ones don't look too much like the mature mushrooms. LOL... sulfur tuft again.. they are so appealing looking :P Fall,Geotagged,Hypholoma fasciculare,Sulphur tuft,United States

Habitat

''Hypholoma fasciculare'' grows prolifically on the dead wood of both deciduous and coniferous trees. It is more commonly found on decaying deciduous wood due to the lower lignin content of this wood relative to coniferous wood. ''Hypholoma fasciculare'' is widespread and abundant in northern Europe and North America. It has been recorded from Iran, and also eastern Anatolia in Turkey. It can appear anytime from spring to autumn.
Sulphur tuft cluster on moss-covered tree This is a HDR of 3 bracketed images, the 1st time I used my new tripod in the field. This scene also taught me something about fungi: timing matters. I returned to the exact same spot 2 weeks later, only to find absolutely nothing there at all. Not a single trace of them. I'm sure they were not removed by humans as there is no point in doing so, and this is a remote area of wild growth (where I shouldn't even be, I was effectively trespassing). Europe,Heeswijk,Hypholoma fasciculare,Macro,Netherlands,Sulphur tuft

Defense

The toxicity of sulfur tuft mushrooms has been attributed, at least partially, to steroid depsipeptides fasciculol E and fasciculol F values of 50 mg/kg and 168 mg/kg, respectively). In humans, symptoms may be delayed for 5–10 hours after consumption, after which time there may be diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, proteinuria and collapse. Paralysis and impaired vision have been recorded. Symptoms generally resolve over a few days. The autopsy of one fatality revealed fulminant hepatitis reminiscent of amatoxin poisoning, along with involvement of kidneys and myocardium. The mushroom was consumed in a dish with other species so the death cannot be attributed to sulfur tuft with certainty.
Sulphur tuft "city", Netherlands  Europe,Heeswijk,Hypholoma fasciculare,Macro,Netherlands,Sulphur tuft,autumn

Uses

The "sulphur tuft" is bitter and poisonous; consuming it can cause vomiting, diarrhea and convulsions. The principal toxin is a steroid known as ''fasciculol E''.

References:

Some text fragments are auto parsed from Wikipedia.

Taxonomy
KingdomFungi
DivisionBasidiomycota
ClassAgaricomycetes
OrderAgaricales
FamilyStrophariaceae
GenusHypholoma
SpeciesH. fasciculare