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Large Red Damselfly - male (5:1), Heesch, Netherlands <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93550/large_red_damselfly_-_male_2.51_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Large Red Damselfly - male (2.5:1), Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/93550_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1620259210&Signature=8hnJ45nE8tSwJadGtsXBpcMq1Pk%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Large Red Damselfly - male (2.5:1), Heesch, Netherlands https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93551/large_red_damselfly_-_male_51_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
Henriette found this struggling damselfly on the doorstep of our garden, saving it from being squashed as we regularly pass through there. It looked bodily intact yet barely moving and very sandy. It made no attempt to flee or escape. I already had it in a tube as a stacking subject, when I changed my mind and gave it a second chance. It put it in a sunny place and gave it drips of water. I waited for 4 hours yet it stayed in its miserable state. It wasn&#039;t going to make it. I found 4 more of the same species in the garden, all healthy.<br />
<br />
As a side note: it concerns me to find insects that are bodily intact yet dying. It has me thinking they may have a neurological problem. Read: they are poisoned. I live in an area with intense agriculture and it is known that some pesticides are designed to attach to receptors in the insect&#039;s brain, poisoning them very slowly. I don&#039;t have the skill or evidence to suggest that this is what happened, it&#039;s just something on my mind.<br />
<br />
This looks to be the male of the species. Both shots are side views at 2.5 and 5 x macro, respectively, lit by a single flash with a big diffuser. Extreme Macro,Large Red Damselfly,Pyrrhosoma nymphula,WeMacro" /></a></figure><br />
Henriette found this struggling damselfly on the doorstep of our garden, saving it from being squashed as we regularly pass through there. It looked bodily intact yet barely moving and very sandy. It made no attempt to flee or escape. I already had it in a tube as a stacking subject, when I changed my mind and gave it a second chance. It put it in a sunny place and gave it drips of water. I waited for 4 hours yet it stayed in its miserable state. It wasn&#039;t going to make it. I found 4 more of the same species in the garden, all healthy.<br />
<br />
As a side note: it concerns me to find insects that are bodily intact yet dying. It has me thinking they may have a neurological problem. Read: they are poisoned. I live in an area with intense agriculture and it is known that some pesticides are designed to attach to receptors in the insect&#039;s brain, poisoning them very slowly. I don&#039;t have the skill or evidence to suggest that this is what happened, it&#039;s just something on my mind.<br />
<br />
This looks to be the male of the species. Both shots are side views at 2.5 and 5 x macro, respectively, lit by a single flash with a big diffuser. Extreme Macro,Extreme Macro Portraits,Large Red Damselfly,Pyrrhosoma nymphula,WeMacro Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Large Red Damselfly - male (5:1), Heesch, Netherlands

Large Red Damselfly - male (2.5:1), Heesch, Netherlands https://www.jungledragon.com/image/93551/large_red_damselfly_-_male_51_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
Henriette found this struggling damselfly on the doorstep of our garden, saving it from being squashed as we regularly pass through there. It looked bodily intact yet barely moving and very sandy. It made no attempt to flee or escape. I already had it in a tube as a stacking subject, when I changed my mind and gave it a second chance. It put it in a sunny place and gave it drips of water. I waited for 4 hours yet it stayed in its miserable state. It wasn't going to make it. I found 4 more of the same species in the garden, all healthy.<br />
<br />
As a side note: it concerns me to find insects that are bodily intact yet dying. It has me thinking they may have a neurological problem. Read: they are poisoned. I live in an area with intense agriculture and it is known that some pesticides are designed to attach to receptors in the insect's brain, poisoning them very slowly. I don't have the skill or evidence to suggest that this is what happened, it's just something on my mind.<br />
<br />
This looks to be the male of the species. Both shots are side views at 2.5 and 5 x macro, respectively, lit by a single flash with a big diffuser. Extreme Macro,Large Red Damselfly,Pyrrhosoma nymphula,WeMacro

Henriette found this struggling damselfly on the doorstep of our garden, saving it from being squashed as we regularly pass through there. It looked bodily intact yet barely moving and very sandy. It made no attempt to flee or escape. I already had it in a tube as a stacking subject, when I changed my mind and gave it a second chance. It put it in a sunny place and gave it drips of water. I waited for 4 hours yet it stayed in its miserable state. It wasn't going to make it. I found 4 more of the same species in the garden, all healthy.

As a side note: it concerns me to find insects that are bodily intact yet dying. It has me thinking they may have a neurological problem. Read: they are poisoned. I live in an area with intense agriculture and it is known that some pesticides are designed to attach to receptors in the insect's brain, poisoning them very slowly. I don't have the skill or evidence to suggest that this is what happened, it's just something on my mind.

This looks to be the male of the species. Both shots are side views at 2.5 and 5 x macro, respectively, lit by a single flash with a big diffuser.

    comments (11)

  1. This shot is amazing!! Sad for the damselfly though. I've seen poisoned insects before and have noticed that they often act "confused" and lethargic before dying, as you described. Hope that wasn't the case for this fella though, of course. Posted 11 months ago
    1. Thank you, lethargic is the perfect word to describe their state. Posted 11 months ago
  2. Impressive detail (of course :o) I suspect your "poisoned"-theory might not be too far off actually ... :-/ Posted 11 months ago
    1. Thanks. Just the day before I happened to have read this excellent yet gruwesome article:
      https://www.ftm.nl/artikelen/toxicoloog-tennekes-had-al-die-tijd-gelijk-over-bijensterfte
      (article was free then but now requires a signup, sorry)
      Posted 11 months ago
      1. Ah, yes, Tennekes and the pro's at Wageningen denying his publication (being sponsored by Bayer and all that ...) - didn't sign up right now, but have long followed the discussion of course ;-/ Posted 11 months ago
        1. I didn't, was completely new to the discussion. Ah well :( Posted 11 months ago
          1. Hi Ferdy, I've signed up for FTM for the time being. Not sure how long my budget can support that, but they do good work, well worth supporting. The article about Tennekes and the neonics is an excellent and truthful summary of this sad and embarrassing story, but they have many other themes that make for interesting reading (although I don't really have much time for that), so thanks for the tip(!) It hadn't occurred to me before that this was a worthwhile cause/undertaking to support with what little I can. Cheers, Arp Posted 11 months ago
            1. It's an awesome publication indeed, when they first started I read them every day but somehow lost track of them. I guess a lack of time, just like you. "The correspondent" is another excellent example of genuine journalism. Posted 11 months ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    JungleDragon founder, Ferdy Christant has begun a journey into the world of extreme macro photography! These incredible photos go beyond 1:1 macro photography to highlight the amazing details in nature that we would otherwise miss! {Photo credits: Ferdy Christant} #JungleDragon #extrememacro #highmagnificationphotography

    For more high magnification photos:
    Posted 11 months ago
    1. Oh wow, thank you for the spotlight. No pressure at all hehe. Funny how I would have picked the exact same subset. Posted 11 months ago
      1. You're welcome...and no pressure! You're already doing great! Love all the extreme macro shots! Posted 11 months ago

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The Large Red Damselfly ''Pyrrhosoma nymphula'' is a European damselfly. It is one of the first damselflies to emerge in the year.

Similar species: Dragonflies And Damselflies
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 1, 2020. Captured Apr 22, 2020 22:08.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/1.2
  • 1/400s
  • ISO64
  • 50mm