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Plecia mating pair The male with larger eyes at bottom of image, body length 7 mm. With numerous species of this genus in Australia, not confident to specifically ID. <br />
They are nectar and pollen feeders. <br />
 Australia,Bibionidae,Diptera,Geotagged,Macro,Spring,arthropod,fauna,flies,insect,invertebrate,mating,reproduction Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Plecia mating pair

The male with larger eyes at bottom of image, body length 7 mm. With numerous species of this genus in Australia, not confident to specifically ID.
They are nectar and pollen feeders.

    comments (7)

  1. Do you know why the males have such big eyes? Is it something obvious, like finding females :) Posted one year ago
    1. Great question Ferdy. What you suggest seems utterly feasible. Posted one year ago
      1. I'm pretty sure that the consensus is that the males have large (holoptic) eyes so they can spot females more easily. This is common in many dipterans, especially those who form mating swarms. Also interesting is that males have extra large ommatidia in what's called the "love spot" of their eyes. The enlarged ommatidia allows more light to enter those ommatidia and increases response speed when a female is spotted. In combination, the large ommatidia and holoptic eyes makes the males very sensitive to motion and excellent at tracking their target (a female). Posted one year ago
        1. Thanks, both! Now I recall reading about mayflies where the males sometimes also have huge eyes for indeed finding females in a swarm. Little pervs, not even trying to hide it. Posted one year ago
          1. They are making the most out of their situation ;P

            With many insects, the males emerge first and are literally waiting for the females. They will even guard cocoons and pupae of females so they can be the first, um..."in line".
            Posted one year ago
        2. Fascinating feedback Christine, thanks so much. Posted one year ago
          1. You’re welcome, Ruth :) Posted one year ago

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By Ruth Spigelman

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Uploaded Jun 19, 2019. Captured Nov 17, 2018 14:18 in 59 Merewether St, Merewether NSW 2291, Australia.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm