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Deinopis subrufa female at night At 15C/59F, nights are a little cooler now, but there's still plenty to find. Always a delight to come across an Ogre spider - this one a little female. These spiders do not spin conventional webs, they hang out like this in the foliage with a tiny silken net strung between their front legs when hunting, ready to ensnare a passing meal. 10mm body length. Araneae,Australia,Deinopis subrufa,Geotagged,arachnid,arthropod,deinopis subrufa,fauna,invertebrate,macro,net-casting spider,ogre-faced spider,spider Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Deinopis subrufa female at night

At 15C/59F, nights are a little cooler now, but there's still plenty to find. Always a delight to come across an Ogre spider - this one a little female. These spiders do not spin conventional webs, they hang out like this in the foliage with a tiny silken net strung between their front legs when hunting, ready to ensnare a passing meal. 10mm body length.

    comments (6)

  1. Welcome Ruth.
    Love this strange perspective and I don't think ogre-faced is fair for these.
    Posted one year ago
  2. Welcome Ruth! I love this - looks like it's doing spider ballet :) Posted one year ago
  3. Welcome! :D Good to see you here!

    And you already know how much I LOVE this photo! <3
    Posted one year ago
  4. Welcome on board, Ruth! Incredible species. To those unfamiliar with their net casting behavior, sharing this video (not by me):



    And interesting to hear 15C as being a cold night, it would be a very hot night here hehe.
    Posted one year ago
  5. Amazing image - almost surreal! Posted one year ago
  6. Love it, my favourite spiders! Posted one year ago

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''Deinopis subrufa'' is a species of net-casting spiders. It occurs in eastern Australia and Tasmania. It is a nocturnal hunter, having excellent eyesight, and hunts using a silken net to capture its prey. They feed on a variety of insects - ants, beetles, crickets and other spiders. They can vary in color from fawn to pinkish brown or chocolate brown. Females are about 25mm in body length, males about 22mm. They are not dangerous to humans.

This species is often found on a few strands.. more

Similar species: Spiders
Species identified by Christine Young
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 23, 2018. Captured Apr 28, 2018 19:51 in Gardeners Link Trail, Dudley NSW 2290, Australia.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/16.0
  • 1/256s
  • ISO320
  • 100mm