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The critically endangered White Eyed Leaf Frog (Agalychnis lemur) in a former conservation program at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Agalychnis lemur, the white eyed leaf frog, is a critically threatened species (formerly Hylomantis lemur and Phyllomedusa lemur).  The species has endured serious population declines throughout its range in Central America.  Deadly amphibian chytrid fungus is believed to have played a part in the species’ decline as has habitat destruction.  IUCN lists it as endangered.  The species deposits eggs on leaves above a water source where they develop until they hatch.  Hatching tadpoles drop into the water below.  This individual is from a population in Central Panama. Agalychnis lemur,America,Centra,Hylidae,Hylomantis lemur,IUCN endangered,Phyllomedusa lemur,amphibian decline,chytrid fungus,declining population,habitat destruction,leaf frog,monkey frog,phyllomedusinae,tree frog Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

The critically endangered White Eyed Leaf Frog (Agalychnis lemur) in a former conservation program at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

Agalychnis lemur, the white eyed leaf frog, is a critically threatened species (formerly Hylomantis lemur and Phyllomedusa lemur). The species has endured serious population declines throughout its range in Central America. Deadly amphibian chytrid fungus is believed to have played a part in the species’ decline as has habitat destruction. IUCN lists it as endangered. The species deposits eggs on leaves above a water source where they develop until they hatch. Hatching tadpoles drop into the water below. This individual is from a population in Central Panama.

    comments (3)

  1. So gorgeous. Posted 7 months ago
  2. Beautiful!
    Double checking with you: various sources name this "Hylomantis lemur / Lemur tree frog".
    Compared to "Agalychnis lemur / White Eyed Leaf Frog", which do you consider the accepted name to use?
    Posted 7 months ago
  3. From today's JungleDragon Facebook post:
    "Frog eyes!! Frogs may be well-known for their jumping skills, croaking, and slimy skin, but their eyes are seriously impressive! Eyes are such complex sensory organs, and frog eyes have several characteristics that make them even more amazing! Most frogs have large, bulging eyes that are positioned on top of their heads. The size and position of their eyeballs gives them close to a 360 degree field of view and compensates for their inability to turn their heads. Their eyes also have a nictitating membrane, which is like a semi-transparent eyelid that protects and camouflages their eyes. Frogs have powerful night vision, thanks to a mirror-like layer of tissue behind their retinas, called the tapetum lucidum, which makes their eyes appear to glow in the dark. It helps them see objects in low light. And, if their eyes get damaged, they can regenerate the different structures and self-repair! Amazing! One of the most strangely cool things about frog eyes is that they help with eating. Frogs don't have the muscles needed to chew and swallow their food. So, when a frog swallows, its eyes retract into openings in their skull, push the food down its throat, and help it to swallow! Eyes are amazing organs. Just the fact that all the components in an eyeball work together so that we can see the world around us is astounding! The diversity of frog eye color and patterns, in addition to their special features makes frog eyes truly exceptional. {Credits are in the comments} #JungleDragon"
    Posted 3 days ago

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''Hylomantis lemur'' is a species of frog in the family Hylidae that is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama.
Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical moist montane forest, rivers, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marshes.

It is threatened by habitat loss and the fungal disease chytridiomycosis.

Similar species: Frogs
Species identified by Christine Young
View Anotheca's profile

By Anotheca

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 30, 2018. Captured Jun 9, 2011 06:48.
  • DSLR-A100
  • f/14.0
  • 1/125s
  • ISO200
  • 100mm